Established 1874.

The Oberlin Review

Capoeira Captivates Students

From+left+to+right%2C+College+senior+Dav%C3%ADd+Zager+and+College+junior+Deron+Essex+receive+instruction+in+Capoeira+Angola+from+Mestre+Jurandir+of+the+International+Capoeira+Angola+Foundation.+Capoeira+is+a+martial+art+and+dance+form+developed+by+Angolans+in+Brazil+in+the+16th+century.+The+art+form+is+practiced+in+countries+all+over+the+world%2C+and+made+its+way+to+the+U.S.+in+the+late+20th+century.%C2%A0%0A%0ASeveral+students+took+part+in+the+trip+to+Brazil+over+Winter+Term%2C+led+by+Associate+Professor+of+Theater+and+Africana+Studies+Justin+Emeka%2C+OC+%E2%80%9995.+Students+spent+20+days+in+the+cities+of+Belo+Horizonte+and+Salvador%2C+working+with+three+different+Capoeira+groups+and+participating+in+a+facilitated+discussion+on+how+the+art+can+be+used+to+face+racial+divides+and+inequality+in+the+U.S.%C2%A0
From left to right, College senior Davíd Zager and College junior Deron Essex receive instruction in Capoeira Angola from Mestre Jurandir of the International Capoeira Angola Foundation. Capoeira is a martial art and dance form developed by Angolans in Brazil in the 16th century. The art form is practiced in countries all over the world, and made its way to the U.S. in the late 20th century. 

Several students took part in the trip to Brazil over Winter Term, led by Associate Professor of Theater and Africana Studies Justin Emeka, OC ’95. Students spent 20 days in the cities of Belo Horizonte and Salvador, working with three different Capoeira groups and participating in a facilitated discussion on how the art can be used to face racial divides and inequality in the U.S. 

From left to right, College senior Davíd Zager and College junior Deron Essex receive instruction in Capoeira Angola from Mestre Jurandir of the International Capoeira Angola Foundation. Capoeira is a martial art and dance form developed by Angolans in Brazil in the 16th century. The art form is practiced in countries all over the world, and made its way to the U.S. in the late 20th century.  Several students took part in the trip to Brazil over Winter Term, led by Associate Professor of Theater and Africana Studies Justin Emeka, OC ’95. Students spent 20 days in the cities of Belo Horizonte and Salvador, working with three different Capoeira groups and participating in a facilitated discussion on how the art can be used to face racial divides and inequality in the U.S. 

Photo courtesy of Justin Emeka

Photo courtesy of Justin Emeka

From left to right, College senior Davíd Zager and College junior Deron Essex receive instruction in Capoeira Angola from Mestre Jurandir of the International Capoeira Angola Foundation. Capoeira is a martial art and dance form developed by Angolans in Brazil in the 16th century. The art form is practiced in countries all over the world, and made its way to the U.S. in the late 20th century.  Several students took part in the trip to Brazil over Winter Term, led by Associate Professor of Theater and Africana Studies Justin Emeka, OC ’95. Students spent 20 days in the cities of Belo Horizonte and Salvador, working with three different Capoeira groups and participating in a facilitated discussion on how the art can be used to face racial divides and inequality in the U.S. 

Victoria Garber, Arts Editor

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Established 1874.
Capoeira Captivates Students