The Oberlin Review

Oberlin’s Early History Rooted in Religious Convictions

Nathan Carpenter, Editor-in-Chief

September 20, 2019

 Editor’s note: This column is part of a series that will focus on Oberlin’s history as a town and an institution. The series will be published regularly throughout the fall semester. In the winter of 1858, John Price, a formerly enslaved person, was captured by slave catchers traveling through Oberlin and taken to Wellington, ostensibly under the authority of the Fugitive Slave Law. A group of Oberlin residents followed Price and his captors, ultimately bringing him back to Oberlin after a prolonged standoff. Now known as the Oberlin-Wellington Rescue, the event is widely regarded as one of the key incidents precipitating the Civil War, and continues to hold an important place in Oberlin’s collective hist...

Opinions Section Should Reflect Entire Community

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

September 13, 2019

 Last May, I finally had the opportunity to stay on campus during Commencement week working as opinions editor for the Review’s Commencement issue. Admittedly, I was most excited to spend time with my friends who would be graduating and take part in all the Commencement week festivities. However, one of the coolest things that happened that week was also very unexpected. During Commencement week, alumni are invited back for class reunions to connect with other Oberlin alumni and current students, reconvene with old professors, reminisce on old Oberlin memories, and help celebrate the newest class of alumni. Many of the alumni stay in old dormitories and relive their old Oberlin experiences. The Review hosted an...

Student Life Leaves Student Priorities, Voices Behind

David Mathisson, Columnist

September 13, 2019

 Last Friday, when the police were patrolling campus and handing students jaywalking tickets in excess of $100, student voices called for a better solution. At the time, Campus Safety largely dismissed those voices. It took over a hundred people speaking up to gain administrative support for a solution that focused on the students. The fact that we need numbers like that to enact win-win policies is demonstrative of a problem bigger than just the crosswalk: the administration’s chronic refusal to involve students in policymaking is leading to bad policies in many areas of student life. On Monday, after a protest planned in response to the tickets received over 120 responses on Facebook in less than 48 hours, I began...

Big Pharma Lawsuits Won’t Sufficiently Address Opioid Crisis

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

September 6, 2019

 In a landmark case that concluded on Aug. 26, Judge Thad Balkman of Oklahoma ordered biotech company Johnson & Johnson to pay the state $572 million for their hand in the prescription opioid epidemic that continues to ravage the country. When I first learned of the case, I didn’t understand how the company known for making baby powders and soaps had a hand in perpetuating the opioid epidemic. Upon further research, I found that Johnson & Johnson actually has a hand in almost every major aspect of pharmaceuticals and first aid supplies. The company owns brands such as Band-Aid, Tylenol, Neutrogena, Acuvue contacts, Clean and Clear, and — of course — Johnson’s baby products.  However, consumer prod...

Examining Oberlin’s History Rewarding, Provides Insight

Nathan Carpenter, Editor-in-Chief

September 6, 2019

Editor’s note: This column is the first in a series that will focus on Oberlin’s history as a town and an institution. The series will be published regularly throughout the fall semester. Through the decades, Oberlin has demonstrated a strong commitment to documenting and preserving its own history. Mudd Center boasts extensive archival collections; for a town and college of modest size, a surprising number of books and essays have been written about Oberlin. While many Oberlin historians have had some connection with the college or town, many journalists and scholars from outside of this community have also taken an interest in Oberlin’s historical impact on the broader trajectory of American history. This past W...

Administration Must Return Our Eggs

David Mathisson, Columnist

September 6, 2019

 Following student-organized CDS boycotts this past April, the administration offered several changes to available meal plans: $200 in Flex Points tacked onto the first-year and sophomore meal plan, reinstatement of the 200- and 100-meals-per-semester plans available to juniors and seniors, and promises to increase quality, variety, and value at DeCafé. I am proud to have been an organizer in the movement, to have arranged the protest that preceded many of these concessions, and proud of our community for standing up for low-income students and their families. I am disappointed by our administration’s failure to deliver on many of the commitments it made following the boycott, as well as its neglect of the qua...

Disabled Student-Athletes Must Have Accessibility Needs Met

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

May 3, 2019

 In light of the Academic and Administrative Program Review and financial stress at Oberlin College, there has been a lot of student concern surrounding physical accessibility. We know that there will be absolutely necessary cuts in order to secure the financial longevity of the institution. However, one thing that cannot be sacrificed is accessibility for disabled students.  The resources for disabled students are already slim. Despite the genuine effort, care, and concern that Disability Resources staff provides, the department is drastically under-resourced. Some academic buildings and dormitories are not up to code, and others are entirely inaccessible to those with physical disabilities. Work orders are often ...

Oberlin Should Invest More in Honors Program

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

April 26, 2019

 When I visited Oberlin as a junior in high school, I was intrigued by the College’s honors program. Though the speaker did not go into detail about what the program entailed, it sounded exactly like the sort of thing I would be interested in doing, as well as something that might seem impressive to future post-graduate programs or employers.  However, after attending two Senior Symposiums during my first and second years as a student, I realize the honors program at Oberlin is much more than I originally thought. It is more than just an opportunity for students to say they graduated “with honors,” or a way to impress future employers and universities. Rather, honors incorporates many elements that draw prosp...

Wind Farms Do Pose Health, Procedural Justice Concerns

Nathan Carpenter, Editor-in-Chief

April 12, 2019

 At a recent Republican Party fundraiser, President Donald Trump made headlines for yet another bizarre, unprompted statement, remarking that the noise from wind turbines has the potential to cause cancer. As many scientists, journalists, and politicians on both sides of the aisle immediately pointed out, there is no evidence to corroborate this claim. Several Democratic presidential candidates chimed in, mocking Trump’s ignorance. Iowa’s senators, both of whom are Republican, weighed in against the president, as representatives of a state significantly invested in wind energy. Even Kellyanne Conway’s husband, George, got a piece of the action, adding “Windmill cancer survivor” to his Twitter bio. While t...

Heartbeat Bill Represents Skewed Priorities for Ohio Governor, State Legislature

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

April 12, 2019

 The infamous “heartbeat bill” passed the Ohio state legislature this Wednesday, and after several years of emotional debates, numerous vetoes, and amendments to the bill, Governor Mike DeWine officially signed the bill on Thursday night. The passage of this bill effectively hinders every woman’s ability to get an abortion in the state of Ohio.  Ohio now has the most restrictive abortion laws in the country. The bill bans abortion after six weeks into a pregnancy and makes no exceptions for cases of rape or incest. Furthermore, doctors who do not test for a heartbeat or proceed with abortion procedures if a heartbeat is detected will be charged with a fifth-degree felony, punishable by up to a year in jail and a ...

Scuba Diving Can Help People Deal with Physical, Mental Challenges

Ananya Gupta, Managing Editor

February 15, 2019

I must be the only 20-year-old who, when presented with the opportunity to travel to Goa, the party state of India, decided to spend it all several meters under water. Under the tutelage of the Professional Association of Diving Instructors, I underwent rigorous training and testing over the span of a week to become a certified Open Water Diver. I am now qualified to dive up to a depth of 18 meters (60 feet) when accompanied by a dive buddy or dive professional anywhere in the world. While scuba diving had already been on my bucket list — courtesy of elitist Bollywood films and Lara Croft: Tomb Raider — I also seem to be a part of the generation of “conscious travelers.” Traveling with purpose seems to...

Women’s Rights Discussions Should Not Focus on Abortion

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

February 8, 2019

At the State of the Union address Tuesday, President Donald Trump asserted a harsh anti-abortion stance. This comes after several weeks without mention of abortion policies from the Trump administration; of the past four addresses to Congress, the State of the Union address was the first time Trump has even mentioned abortion to members of Congress. Many have been quick to assert that the reason Trump commented on abortion at all was to attempt to fire up his religious base for his upcoming re-election campaign. However, I would argue that it is highly significant that this sudden harsh stance just happened to coincide with one of the most powerful displays of women’s solidarity in congressional history. The...

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