The Oberlin Review

Opioid Epidemic Cannot Be Fought Through War on Drugs

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

February 16, 2018

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

Almost exactly a year ago, I wrote a piece for The Oberlin Review about the opioid epidemic, specifically in Ohio, and what could be done about it. Since then, there has been no significant reduction in opioid-related deaths in the state or in the nation. According to The Columbus Dispatch, Ohio’s drug overdose rate increased to 39 percent from mid-2016 to mid-2017; the national average is 13.3 percent. Ohio’s 2017 opioid-related data looks bleak. The state had the third most opioid-related overdoses and the third highest overdose rate increase out of any other state in 2017, totaling 5,200 deaths. Montgomery County in southern Ohio reached 800 overdose deaths in 2017 and had to expand its morgue to accommodate t...

Students Must Take Initiative as Allies

Sadie Keller, Rowan Maher, and Jesus Martinez

February 9, 2018

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

Unsurprisingly, Donald Trump’s racism and xenophobia did not take a winter break. When the president made disturbing comments about immigrants and the countries from which they hail, he insulted millions and negated ideas of respect, mobility, and equality — values fundamental to the Oberlin community. The president’s dangerous rhetoric and policies have made the past year and a half an escalating nightmare for many members of our community. Thousands of recipients of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) live in Ohio, and Lorain County is home to a number of undocumented immigrants. Many of our neighbors live in precarious positions of safety and belonging due to their relationship with immigration — with Tempo...

Budget Resolution Must Come with Conditions

Chris Howell, Contributing Writer

February 9, 2018

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

Oberlin College is once again in full budget crisis mode. For anyone who has been here a while, there is something wearily and depressingly familiar about these cycles of boom and bust. The crises always come out of nowhere, the result of some generalized affliction affecting higher education for which no one here is responsible. The process of budget cutting always has to take place at breakneck speed so that the normal governance structures can be by- passed and broader thinking about how to resolve the mess is impossible. And the overwhelming burden of the cutting always — but always — falls on the College’s employees, its unionized workers, staff, and faculty, though rarely the senior administration. This time around, th...

Internment Exhibit Represents Integral Part of Oberlin History, Identity

Kenneth Kitahata, Shelley Lee, and Mackenzie Lew

February 9, 2018

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

Each year, we mark key anniversaries for events that transformed American life and history from December to February. On Dec. 7, 1941, the Empire of Japan attacked the United States Naval Base at Pearl Harbor, forcing us to decide whether or not to enter the Second World War. Over the ensuing months, officials debated what policies should be implemented to keep the nation secure, including the possibility of removing and incarcerating “enemy aliens” — even U.S. citizens — who might be loyal to America’s adversaries. Feb. 19 also marks a particularly poignant anniversary for the nation, and especially for Japanese Americans. On that day in 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066, authorizi...

Trump Abandons Precedent in Israel, Endangers Citizens

Marah Ajilat, Contributing Writer

December 8, 2017

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

All Americans, Jewish or otherwise, should oppose Trump’s decision to relocate the U.S. Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem. The truth is, Trump is only invested in Jews because he thinks the holy city of Jerusalem is his ticket to a second presidential term. It should come as no surprise that Trump only seeks to serve himself and his self-interest. He banned Muslims from seven countries from entering the U.S., claiming fear of terrorism, but did not include Saudi Arabia, the country where some 9/11 hijackers were citizens, on that list, because he did not want to compromise his business relations with Saudi Arabia — from whom he had a received a $100-million check months before. Similarly, Trump and the American Israel P...

Students Should Commit to Integrity

Katie Lucey, Production Editor

December 8, 2017

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

“I have adhered to the Honor Code in this assignment.” As students of Oberlin College, we are required to sign this pledge on every assignment we turn in. Yet this year, the Student Honor Committee has already doubled its total cases of potential Honor Code violations from last year. Despite what many Oberlin students might think, the purpose of the committee is to educate — not punish — students who violate the Honor Code. The value of the Honor Code lies in its role of cultivating the kind of atmosphere of intellectual freedom and discourse that we hold so dear at Oberlin. If, as a student body, we fail to follow the Honor Code, we cannot possibly expect to uphold our institution’s core values of respect...

Privacy in Digital Age Under Attack

Leah Treidler, Contributing Writer

December 1, 2017

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

We are living in a dystopian sci-fi novel. Or at the very least, we might be headed that way. The government is tracking our every move and, even worse, pretending that we consent to it. In 2010, Timothy “Little Tim” Carpenter and three other men robbed a Radio Shack, stealing hundreds of cell phones. Little did they know that they would spark the most critical court case on digital privacy to date. After eight more robberies, Little Tim was arrested. Eyewitnesses identified him as the leader, testifying that he had planned the robberies and served as a lookout, waiting across the street in a stolen car for his accomplices to return with the cell phones. Ironically, it was his own cell phone that sealed his fate. ...

OSCA Fails to Adequately Address Needs of POC

Carson Li, Contributing Writer

November 17, 2017

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

Alright, white folks, let’s be honest — do you really care that the co-op you’re living in is too white? I was pretty surprised when my white friend, not a friend of color, first raised this question. It initially made me feel good because I felt like white people in my co-op were advocating for more diversity in our community. Later, things turned out to be different than I thought. Co-op diversity for many white people is just a casual topic for chit-chat while hanging out in the lounge. By the way, don’t get them talking about race; those white people can analyze the definition of race from four different angles. As an international student hailing from China, nearly all of my knowledge about race and dis...

GOP Tax Reform Threatens Future of Higher Education

Xander Kott, Contributing Writer

November 17, 2017

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

In a 227 to 205 vote Thursday, the House of Representatives passed major tax reform legislation, described by President Donald Trump as “one of the great Christmas presents,” that has significant implications for many people, including Oberlin students. The bill will now move to the Senate for consideration. Republicans have been touting the bill — known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act — as a blessing for the middle class. They have also declared that it will serve as a catalyst for economic growth. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan commented that “the whole purpose of this [bill] is a middle-class tax cut,” and Secretary of the Treasury Steve Mnuchin has stated that the bill is “about bringing trillions of ...

Oberlin, Gibson’s Should Settle Out-of-Court

Booker C. Peek, Contributing Writer

November 17, 2017

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

We should all root for a quick out-of-court resolution between Gibson’s Bakery and Oberlin College. It can be exciting for us to root for our favorite teams; that is what sports are all about. We may debate who the greatest composer is, the finest painter, or the best dancer. Having all those options is what we enjoy in America, along with the right not to take part at all. But there are times when the outcome of a matter affects us quite profoundly. This lawsuit is not a sporting event; its outcome has the potential to be earth-shattering. The founders of the College settled in a wilderness in the 19th century, a site where there were no humans at all. In the intervening period — more than 150 years — we have...

American Apathy Perpetuates Gun Violence

Sam Schaffer, Contributing Writer

November 10, 2017

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

Editor’s Note: This article contains mentions of violent imagery. America is truly an exceptional place. One exceptional aspect of American life is the possibility for an American to go to a concert and leave with wounds similar to those suffered by soldiers in wartime. Here’s another: An American can to go to church on Sunday and leave in a blood-soaked body bag. Here’s one more: Any American can be assured that, if an indiscriminately fired bullet puts them or their friend, sibling, parent, or spouse on the mortician’s table, the same is bound to happen to another person somewhere in America, without warning and with the guarantee that it will happen again. We all heard that it will happen again, after San...

Weinstein Scandal Representative of Deeper Dynamics

Christian Bolles, Editor-in-Chief

November 10, 2017

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

“They knew.” That’s a mantra oft-repeated by the public in response to the cascade of celebrities who have denounced their colleagues following a cataclysmic domino effect of assault allegations made over the past month. Accusations of harassment, rape, and all-around creepiness leveled at Hollywood director Harvey Weinstein were the first cracks in the industry’s golden façade — which has now shattered beneath the weight of hundreds of similar claims aimed at other titans of that breeding ground of fame and misfortune. In the hugely disturbing wake of this scandal, sharp words have been exchanged, tears have been shed, and giants have fallen — but the question at the tip of everyone’s tongues, right ...

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