The Oberlin Review

Students and community members gather in Tappan Square for a climate strike on the morning of Sept. 20.

A Dispatch From Oberlin’s Climate Strike

April 22, 2020

Editor’s note: On Sept. 20, 2019, the Global Climate Strike took place in thousands of communities around the world, as millions of people rallied to support the urgency of climate change solutions. In Oberlin, more than 600 students and community members gathered at the grandstand in Tappan Square to join the global movement. The following was the rally’s opening address, which has been edited for length and clarity. Good morning, everyone. My name is Faith Ward, and I want to welcome you ...

Earlier this month, the demolition of the Crawford coal plant’s smokestack sent dust billowing into the Chicago community of
Little Village in the midst of a global pandemic.

COVID-19, Climate Justice Fundamentally Linked

April 22, 2020

When this Editorial Board first met to discuss possible directions for our work in this issue, the possibilities seemed limitless. After all, environmental themes like resource overuse, air and water pollution, and environmental policy and racism all intersect with the Oberlin community in countless ways as climate change continues to impact life around the world, including in Northeast Ohio. Now, as we complete this magazine while sheltered in place, our futures have changed in ways we had not...

Barefoot Dialogue: Seeking Connection to People and Land

Barefoot Dialogue: Seeking Connection to People and Land

April 22, 2020

https://issuu.com/theoberlinreview/docs/the_oberlin_review_special_issue/14

Young activists rally for the Green New Deal.

In Favor of the Green New Deal

April 22, 2020

By now, it is clear that the world has until 2030 to limit the catastrophic effects of climate change by keeping global average temperatures from rising 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. In order to meet this goal, global carbon emissions will need to drop 45 percent from 2010 levels over the next 10 years. At our current rate, the world will not even meet the Paris Climate Agreement target of limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial temperature levels by then, and...

In UCC Report, Northeast Ohio Identified As “Hot Spot” of Environmental Injustice

Nathan Carpenter, Editor-in-Chief

April 22, 2020

This past February, the United Church of Christ published a report on polluting facilities located in or near residential communities across the country. The report, titled “Breath to the People: Sacred Air and Toxic Pollution,” focused on 100 “super polluters” throughout the United States, and especially on the impact of those facilities on children under the age of five living in their vicinity. The report was primarily authored by Rev. Traci Blackmon, UCC associate general minister, and Rev. Brooks Berndt, UCC minister of environmental justice. In assembling the report’s narrative, the authors chose to focus on three “hot spots” of toxic air emissions: the Houston metropolitan area, Louisiana’s Cancer Alle...

“Don’t Frack With Us:” How to Stop a Pipeline

Rachael Hood

April 22, 2020

After staunchly opposing the construction of a pipeline through their community, some people will agree to settle and concede the fight while others take to the trees, putting their bodies on the line to stop the destruction of their land. What informs these different responses and why can they look so different for different people? Pondering these questions as I reflected on the anti-pipeline organizing I have been involved in throughout my four years at Oberlin, I decided to do some research that later grew into a year-long senior thesis. Over the past six months, I have interviewed organizers battling two different pipelines: one in Appalachia, the other in the Rust Belt. Both groups fought hard to prevent the pipe...

An image of the author’s property.

Creating a 21st-Century Landscape in Oberlin

April 22, 2020

In December 2006, Mary and I decided to retire from our home in Troy, NY, where we had lived for 33 years — half our lifetimes. Our primary goal was to fulfill a long-held desire to replicate Hilltop, the home of our close friends David and Harriet Borton, that runs on sunshine. Trail Magic, our home in Oberlin, was inspired by the Bortons’ home to attain the same energy outcome. With our focus on making our home completely powered by solar energy, the landscape received minimal attention, as...

In the Bahamas, Hurricane Dorian left significant destruction in its wake.

Hurricane Dorian Reveals Deep Roots of Climate Injustice in Bahamas

April 22, 2020

Officially, 70 lives were lost during Hurricane Dorian, the monster storm that hit the northern islands of the Bahamas in early September 2019. However, residents tell a different story; they claim that over 2,000 died. In February, I traveled across Abaco Island, which was hit particularly hard by Dorian. Months had passed since the hurricane, but still I saw more piles of debris — the wreckage of homes — than standing, livable structures. The winds had stripped the iconic Abaco pine trees of...

Special Issue: Letter From the Editors

Nathan Carpenter and Ananya Gupta

April 22, 2020

Dear readers, As student journalists studying the environment, we have always strived to incorporate environmental initiatives into our work at The Oberlin Review, from shifting to a paperless editing process — saving approximately 10,000 pieces of paper annually — to reducing our print circulation. While we are certainly proud of these eco-friendly transitions in our workplace, we know that environmental and climate narratives are much larger than any person’s, or newspaper’s, individual choices. We still find ourselves intensely curious about the best ways to communicate about the climate challenges currently afflicting communities around the world, including Oberlin. In particular, we continue ...

Climate Change Hits Home

Climate Change Hits Home

April 22, 2020

https://issuu.com/theoberlinreview/docs/the_oberlin_review_special_issue/62

Alaska's natural beauty.

In Shifting Away From Oil, Alaska Could Lead

April 22, 2020

Alaska is warming faster than any other state in the U.S., but its residents are of multiple minds when it comes to addressing the impacts of climate change. The state’s largest city, Anchorage, is specifically caught between two extremes of environmental sentiment among its residents. There are people who spend much of their time outdoors and have a strong appreciation for and connection to their environment and land. They tend to rally for strict laws concerning salmon fishing, littering, an...

To Find Success, GND Must Be Measured

Noah Auby

April 22, 2020

In the 1930s, President Franklin D. Roosevelt introduced a set of legislative proposals under a New Deal that sought to navigate the consequences and investigate the underlying causes of the Great Depression. With these policies, FDR emphasized reforming fiscal, banking, and monetary policies to allow most American citizens to enjoy a greater level of financial stability than ever before. These proposed reforms included major pieces of legislation such as the National Industrial Recovery Act, the Securities Act, the National Labor Relations Act, the Social Security Act, and the Housing Act. While a majority of these policy recommendations faced a great deal of backlash from — and now have largely been repealed by ...

Established 1874.