The Oberlin Review

The Brotherhood Needs to Step Up

Khalid McCalla

September 21, 2018

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

“Rub some dirt on it.” As a young football player, every bump, scrape, and bruise was met with this response or one similar to it. “Shake it off and get back out there,” was the message, and, in a sport like football, this sentiment is sometimes inevitable. You’re going to get hurt. It’s part of the game. You’re expected to take it in stride and continue to help the team. You’re expected to rub some dirt on it. But what happens when the pain you’re feeling can’t be reached by a handful of dirt or pushed aside for the sake of the team? Football finds pride in its masculinity. Every year, teams across the country are filled with only the biggest, strongest, and fastest young men i...

More Than Just ‘Sore’

More Than Just ‘Sore’

September 21, 2018

I have been dealing with chronic back pain since I was 12. It started as an annoying pinching feeling that I’d notice every once in a while. Eventually, this developed into a constant stabbing pain and extreme stiffness; it would wake me up at night and make sitting for long periods of time unbearable. Oddly enough, the pain was worse after long periods of inactivity — this often made sitting through class and getting up in the morning extremely painful. During this time, I continue...

SAAC to Connect Across the Divide

Hannah Rasmussen

September 21, 2018

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

Sitting down to a full room, I took a deep breath and welcomed faces old and new to the first Student-Athlete Advisory Committee meeting of the year. I was pleased to see so many student-athletes in one room, ready to listen, share ideas, and create a community. According to its website, SAAC is a national organization with a mission “to enhance the total student-athlete experience by promoting opportunity, protecting student-athlete welfare, and fostering a positive student-athlete image.” SAAC is the main athletics-focused student organization on Oberlin’s campus. I have attended the group’s monthly meetings since the beginning of my sophomore year. I can remember how my first filled me with a...

Standards Too High for Serena

Hannah Keidan

September 14, 2018

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

As a tennis player, I grew up watching the Williams sisters on television. They were — and still are — my heroes. I would sit criss-cross-applesauce on the family room floor, eyes glazed over, head bobbing back and forth to follow the ball, barely understanding what was happening on the screen. Back in those days, Venus and Serena often played one another in the finals of tournaments. I would root for Venus, since she was the big sister, and my little sister would cheer on Serena. While Venus has fallen out of the spotlight in recent years, Serena continues to dominate the sports page. Yet as I age, I’ve seen her reputation dragged through the mud time and time again. Whether it be positive or negat...

From the Bass to Baseball: Perfecting the Right Pitch

Luke Sprecher

September 14, 2018

Filed under Baseball, SPORTS, Sports Column, Varsity Sports, Varsity Spring

Most Oberlin students arrive on campus at age 17 or 18, but Ian Ashby — first-year Conservatory student — familiarized himself with the College when he was 12 years old. He played baseball competitively in his hometown of Pittsburgh, PA until he was in seventh grade, when his father accepted a position as a Jazz arranging professor in the Conservatory and his family moved to Oberlin. Every Wednesday, 12-year-old Ashby would practice his pitch on the red dirt of the old Dill Field while his dad, Jay Ashby, would teach a class. Dill Field has since been renovated — the classic dirt was switched out for a sleek turf diamond — but nowadays when he steps on the mound, he does so as an Oberlin varsity at...

For Baseball Players in Cuba, a Unique Naming Convention

Julie Schreiber, Staff Writer

September 7, 2018

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

For many people in the United States, the happenings of everyday life in Cuba are nothing short of mysterious. Although the two countries are separated by a mere 103 miles, a half-century of socially-and-economically-restrictive international policy has made it difficult for most citizens of either country to understand what goes on in the other. One way in which Cuba has managed to exert its influence in American culture over the past 50 years is through Major League Baseball. Cuba is one of four major countries in Latin America (the others being Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Venezuela) that have produced some of the most successful baseball players worldwide in recent decades, including many who ...

Germany Does Not Have World Cup Locked Down

Jane Agler, Staff Writer

May 11, 2018

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

The biggest sporting event in the world is finally here. People from all around the globe will be tuning in on June 14 for the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia, where 32 national teams will compete for international glory. Germany — the team that clinched the Cup back in 2014 — is still a favorite, but if the qualifying tournament showed us anything, the World Cup is still going to be full of surprises. Right now, there are only a handful of nations that seem to pose a strong threat. Germany, who will compete with much of the same roster as they did in 2014 — with noteworthy exceptions like Bastian Schweinsteiger and Philipp Lahm — is likely the most intimidating team to arrive in Russia. Following in their wake...

Harvey’s Rollercoaster Mets Career Comes to a Close

Alex McNicoll, Sports Editor

May 11, 2018

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

The New York Mets traded their once-star pitcher Matt Harvey to the Cincinnati Reds on Tuesday, signaling the end of one of the most frustrating eras in a franchise that is not averse to failure. Whether it was the injuries — he had Tommy John surgery in 2013 and was diagnosed with Thoracic Outlet Syndrome in 2016 — his terrible attitude, or the unrelenting storm that is the New York media to blame, what all fans can agree on is that as amazing as he was, he was twice as maddening. When Harvey debuted in July 2012, he turned heads from the get-go, striking out 11 batters in his first appearance. The Mets had not been relevant since losing to the Cardinals in the National League Championship Series in 2006, and their fan b...

Cleveland Botches Potential Rebuild

Jason Hewitt, Staff Writer

May 4, 2018

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

The 2018 NFL Draft was critical for the Cleveland Browns after a season in which they didn’t win a single game, compiling a record of 0–16. There has only been one other team in National Football League history that has gone winless: the 2008 Detroit Lions. The Browns, whose performance has been notoriously bad over the past couple decades, need to make significant changes if they want to overcome their current laughing-stock standing as a laughingstock in the league. One of the best opportunities for a franchise to improve is through the NFL Draft, which occurs every April. Quick changes were absolutely necessary for Browns executives looking to keep their jobs, and they responded by making a number of big — a...

Arsenal FC Loses Wenger, Manager of 22 Years

Jane Agler, Staff Writer

April 27, 2018

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

After 22 years of managing Arsenal Football Club and providing the club with some of its most successful and memorable years to date, the sun is finally setting on Arsène Wenger’s career. Last week, Wenger announced to the public that he was leaving the club after the season finishes, marking the end of one of the most well-known managerial careers of all time. Regardless of the discourse revolving around his departure — much of which centered on whether his leave was overdue — it is necessary to sing the praises of a man who did so much for English and international soccer during one of the last tenured managerial careers seen today. When crunching the numbers, Wenger’s success is obvious. He managed 1,229 ga...

NBA, Adam Silver Need to Address League’s Tanking Problem

Alex McNicoll, Sports Editor

April 20, 2018

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

Tanking is no secret in the NBA. Teams like the Chicago Bulls or the Sacramento Kings openly sit their top veterans in an attempt to “develop young talent,” but in reality, they are intentionally losing to get a better pick. It’s not a new phenomenon. The Philadelphia 76ers did it for three or four years to get Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons, and Markelle Fultz. Even the San Antonio Spurs did it so they could draft Tim Duncan first overall in 1997, and he helped them win five NBA Championships. But tanking is a serious problem that kills the competitive nature of basketball, and commissioner Adam Silver must find a solution, no matter how drastic it may be. At the end of the 82-game regular season, the top 16 teams compet...

Underlying Racism Affects Lamar Jackson’s Draft Stock

Jason Hewitt, Staff Writer

April 13, 2018

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

Louisville Cardinals quarterback Lamar Jackson should easily be one of the top three quarterbacks in this year’s NFL Draft. He won the 2016 Heisman Trophy and arguably had a better season this year. So it’s quite confusing why Jackson has received widespread criticism by NFL scouts and draft analysts and is projected as a late draft in the first round. Jackson is a Black athlete, and the unfortunate root of the criticism he receives is racism. The premier quarterbacks in this year’s draft include Sam Darnold, Baker Mayfield, Josh Allen, and Josh Rosen. The common denominator between these four men is that they are all white with big arms. However, if you watch Lamar Jackson’s film and Pro Day tape, his arm ...

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