The Oberlin Review

Asiya Empowers Athletes

Jackie McDermott, Sports Editor

December 2, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

Hijab-wearing Muslim athletes received some much-needed good news on Monday. A duo of women entrepreneurs announced that they will release a line of hijabs made of a breathable material that absorbs sweat, empowering some Muslim athletes to play more comfortably. Fatimah Hussein, a Somali immigrant and founder of a girls’ sports non-profit, and her business partner, Jamie Glover, founded the modest sportswear company Asiya to meet the demand from the ever-growing number of Muslim girls and women participating in athletics. With this news, the sportswear market promotes a trend of visibility and acceptance of Muslim athletes that has slowly taken hold in the sports world. But that progress is in danger given...

Editorial: Playoff Should Include Top-Six Teams

Darren Zaslau, Sports Editor

November 18, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

History was made in college football last Saturday. For the first time since 1985, three of the top four teams in the nation all lost in the same week. With No. 2 Michigan losing to Iowa, No. 3 Clemson dropping a thriller at home to Pittsburgh and No. 4 Washington falling to USC, the College Football Playoff experienced a mindboggling shake-up. Top-ranked Alabama is currently the only undefeated team in the nation, boasting a perfect 10–0 record in the always-competitive Southeastern Conference. Having outscored its opponents 412–122, Alabama represents the only lock for making the College Football Playoff. As for the other three teams looking to complete the playoff field, predicting the nation’s top-four teams i...

Keep Doping Consequences Heavy

Jackie McDermott, Sports Editor

November 11, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

Tennis’ darling played dumb and received a reprieve. Maria Sharapova’s suspension for meldonium use was reduced from two years to 15 months by the Court of Arbitration of Sport on Oct. 4 because the organization believes Sharapova didn’t intend to cheat. She claims she wasn’t aware that the drug she was taking had become banned. In trimming the tennis star’s suspension, CAS sent the message that, if a player takes a drug with the intent of enhancing performance but claims they weren’t aware that it was banned, they can weasel their way out of her punishment. Further, CAS disrespected the International Tennis Federation by reversing its decision on Sharapova’s case. This opens the door for players...

Stacking Sullies NBA

Darren Zaslau, Sports Editor

November 4, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

The 2015–2016 Golden State Warriors polished off their best NBA regular season ever with a record of 73–9. Led by star point guard and two-time MVP Stephen Curry, last year’s Warriors were just about as perfect as a basketball team can be. Enter Kevin Durant. Adding a seven-time All-Star, former MVP and four-time scoring titleholder to the mix makes the Warriors virtually untouchable and destined to rack up lopsided victories against teams who just can’t compete. As the general viewership of sports decreases, stacking teams in the NBA is not helping the situation. The only way to combat the imminent fan disinterest is through a stricter salary cap. Currently, the NBA salary cap is $94.14 million, up...

Gym Renovations Necessary

Jackie McDermott, Sports Editor

October 28, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

The walls of Philips Gym are lined with photos of those who came before us — the varsity athletes and coaches that dedicated their time, their bodies, their hearts and souls to representing Oberlin to the best of their ability. Earlier this month, it was announced that Philips will soon be turned into a space that would make our predecessors proud. The gym will be expanded through a renovation project that includes new fitness rooms and equipment and an update of Carr Pool, which should be completed in spring 2018. But the renovations won’t just be aimed at the fraction of the student body that gets to have their pictures on the wall, don the crimson and gold and represent our school on varsity athletics teams....

Fernández Never Forgotten

Darren Zaslau, Sports Editor

October 7, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

José Fernández was one of the best pitchers in the history of the Miami Marlins. Posting a 16–8 overall record with a 2.86 earned-run average this season, the star right-handed pitcher will always be remembered for his dominance on the mound. And while Fernández’s on-field presence will never be forgotten, his charity work, community involvement and inspiration shines an even brighter light on the legacy that he leaves behind after his tragic death at the age of 24. After a high-speed boating accident off the coast of Miami Beach on September 25 killed Fernández, baseball fans across the world were shocked. A first-round pick in the 2011 Major League Baseball Draft, Fernández had the determination and talent...

Periods Still Taboo in Sports

Jackie McDermott, Sports editor

September 30, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features, Uncategorized

People who get their periods know the drill. Strategically hide tampons inside pocket of gym bag. Don’t wear white shorts. Chalk poor performance up to a stomach ache if a coach asks, but later confess the real reason to teammates. Or, don’t mention it at all. The menstrual cycle is often referred to as sports’ last taboo. Athletes compete while menstruating at some of the biggest competitions of their careers but shy away from any discussion of the impact their cycles have on athletic performance. Anyone who hosts a monthly visitor can attest to the fatigue, cramping, bloating, weakness, mood swings, tearfulness and anger it can bring. While severity varies from person to person, for many menstruating athletes,...

Individuality Ignored in NFL

Darren Zaslau, Sports Editor

September 23, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

Until recently, “twerking” and “football” have probably never been used in the same sentence. Thanks to Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown, they are now. In the team’s, 38–16 win over Washington in week one of the 2016 NFL season, Brown gave a performance to remember with both his athletic and dancing abilities. After burning down the sideline past Washington cornerback Bashaud Breeland to catch a 26-yard touchdown pass, Brown showed off his twerking skills in the end zone in celebration of his second touchdown reception of the game. Unfortunately for Brown, his moves cost him a steep price, $9,115 in fines. To add insult to injury, the Steelers were also penalized 15 yards on the ensuing...

Protests Power Positive Change

Jackie McDermott, Sports Editor

September 16, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

I’m not here to comment on whether or not Colin Kaepernick is a patriot. Why? Because I’m white. As Kaepernick puts his knee to the gridiron and closes his eyes during those first trumpeted notes of the national anthem, he contemplates stereotypes, fears, anxieties and obstacles that I could never fathom. He pictures the faces of people that looked just like him, splashed onto TV screens as the newest tragic casualties of police brutality. My America is not the same as Kaepernick’s America. The same goes for so many white fans and journalists calling his gesture everything from disrespectful to a heinous affront to veterans and current service members. Why are these onlookers so outraged about one football...

Athletics Expands Sports-Medicine

Sloane Garelick

September 2, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

The Oberlin College Department of Athletics and Physical Education kicked off a groundbreaking partnership with University Hospitals this semester. The program promises to provide student-athletes with additional medical care and puts the College in line with comparable colleges in the region. “We’re right up there as far as what kind of medical coverage we have now,” Senior Associate Director of Athletics Creg Jantz said. “[We are] top of the line compared to other schools. I’d say previously we were toward the bottom, and now we’re at the top.” The partnership with UH is highlighted by the addition of three new physicians to the Oberlin College Sports Medicine team: Dr. James Voos, who specializes...

Play for Pride, Not Points in Olympic Tennis

September 2, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

What does a combination of pure joy and absolute disbelief look like? The look on Mónica Puig’s face as she flung her neon yellow Babolat Pure Aero onto hallowed Olympic ground, raised two fists in the air and marveled at her unbelievable achievement. The scrappy, passionate 22-year-old, ranked number 35 in the world at the start of Olympic tennis, had just become the Cinderella champion of a draw laden with major champions, including four-time gold medalist Serena Williams. As Puig sank to the ground in amazement, she rejoiced not due to any gain in Women’s Tennis Association ranking points that would rocket her to the top of the tour, but because she was overwhelmed with the weight of the pride she had brought...

New on ESPN: a Woman

Sarena Malsin, Sports Editor

May 16, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

For a player with a stand­out legacy and athletic career, Abby Wambach is following a pretty traditional post-re­tirement path for a profes­sional athlete: She’s becom­ing a contributing analyst for ESPN. Wambach, who announced her retirement in October 2015 and played her last game with the Women’s National team in December, said on Wednesday that she will be kicking off her time with the network by cover­ing the European Champion­ships in France in June and the Rio Olympics in August. According to ESPN, she’ll also be working with ESPN Films and other shows, like E:60 and Outside the Lines, which is an investigative show delv­ing into sports controversies, societal issues and athletes’ personal stories....

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