The Oberlin Review

Accessibility to Philosophy Will Positively Affect Field

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

November 10, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

The role of college students in the Oberlin community has long been hotly debated. So, too, has been the lack of the diversity in the field of philosophy. Though these two issues may seem unrelated, the new Philosophy in the Schools Practicum has made a great start in addressing both. Spearheaded by Chair of the Philosophy Department Katherine Thomson-Jones, the PHITS class is a course in both philosophy and education. Every week, the 16 Oberlin students enrolled in PHITS go to Eastwood Elementary School in Oberlin and teach three classrooms of second graders and one of first graders. There, the college students read a children’s book, like Morris the Moose or The Giving Tree, to the class and then facilitate a phi...

Parking Policy Threatens Student Safety

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

September 22, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Upon my arrival to Oberlin as a first-year, I was told that the only designated parking areas for first-years are located next to Mercy Allen Hospital. First-years who park their cars anywhere else are subject to fines of up to $80, plus towing expenses. The fact that the only designated parking for newbies on campus is the farthest lot from campus and most first-year dorms is extremely disadvantageous to first-years. The justification I was given by Safety and Security regarding the inconvenience of first-year parking was that it might discourage first-years from bringing cars to campus. For a college that is so focused on the environment and has limited parking, this would have been an acceptable justification ...

Harvey Hits Both Texas, Economy

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

September 8, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

On Aug. 26, I watched from Oberlin as Hurricane Harvey — a storm that would go down as one of the most devastating natural disasters in Texan history — destroyed my hometown of Houston. Harvey was so destructive because it was slow-moving; the Category 4 hurricane remained a storm up to 117 hours after landfall, a state record, and hovered over Texas for four days straight. The total damage is currently predicted to be between $70 and $90 billion; however, estimates have climbed as high as $190 billion. The destruction Harvey has caused to residents of Texas is devastating. Millions of people’s homes have been irreversibly destroyed, thousands of people are injured, and many roads and bridges are in desperate...

Oberlin Philosophy Professor Tim Hall Dies Unexpectedly

Oberlin Philosophy Professor Tim Hall Dies Unexpectedly

September 1, 2017

Editor's Note: This article contains mention of suicide. Oberlin community members, family, and friends suffered the unexpected loss of Associate Professor of Philosophy Timothy Hall, 48. Hall passed away at 6 a.m. July 23. Coroners suspect suicide. Students were informed of his death in an email sent by Dean of Arts and Sciences Tim Elgren July 24. After earning an undergraduate philosophy degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and receiving his doctorate in philosophy from UCL...

Oberlin Should Seek Out Local Apparel Suppliers

Jackie Brant, Columnist

April 28, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

As the Review reported last week, an investigation by the Worker Rights Consortium released last December revealed that Nike had been using a sweatshop as a supplier for its collegiate clothing, violating its anti-sweatshop agreement with the College. As a college dedicated to social justice, Oberlin has a Sweatshop-Free Apparel Code of Purchasing, meaning that the College refuses to buy from businesses that use sweatshops in their production process. Sweatshops are wildly unjust to workers, as they may force employees to work unreasonable hours in unfit conditions, pay less than minimum wage with no benefits and may use child labor. Unfortunately, most major sports apparel brands have been tainted by labor malpract...

Limited Number of Humanities Classes Pigeonholes Students

Jackie Brant, Columnist

April 21, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Registration season is a stressful time for many students. We worry about when our registration slot will be, if we will get into the classes we need and, if we don’t, if we will be able to successfully navigate add/drop period. As a first-year this spring, I had the second-to-last registration window. By the time I got to pick my classes, there was only one class with spots available in each of my majors, Philosophy and Politics, one of which required a prerequisite that I did not have. Though everyone reassures students that we can fix our schedules during add/drop, that consolation does not save us the stress of waiting months for add/drop over the summer. It also never guarantees that we will get our...

LA Legislature Misses Mark on HIV

Jackie Brant, Columnist

April 7, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

In a fight to end the stigmatization of HIV and AIDS, Democratic lawmakers in Los Angeles are seeking to pass legislation that would reduce the charge for not telling your partner that you have HIV before engaging in unprotected sex from a felony to a misdemeanor. This law would also apply to situations in which HIV positive individuals donate blood or semen. While the stigmatization of HIV and AIDS is an issue that needs to be addressed, the lawmakers’ proposal is not a suitable answer to the problem. Proponents of the bill argue that with the advancements of modern medicine, HIV is treatable. Currently, there are 18.2 million people worldwide on medications for the illness. These medications are generally effective,...

Cities Resist Trump’s Unconstitutional Order

Jackie Brant, Contributing Writer

February 24, 2017

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

Since President Donald Trump assumed office in January, one of his top priorities has been the strict enforcement of immigration laws, including the zealous deportation of undocumented immigrants. His main action to this point has been to issue several flawed executive orders, including one that bars federal funds from sanctuary cities except when mandated by law. This order, signed on Jan. 25, gave rise to many questions. Is the order constitutional? What qualifies as a sanctuary city or university? Can locations avoid the official label of “sanctuary” while still working to protect their undocumented community members? While revisions to the order continue to roll in almost weekly, its unconstitutionality has already b...

Kasich’s Opioid Regulations Backfire

Jackie Brant, Contributing Writer

February 17, 2017

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

Every five hours, someone overdoses on heroin in Ohio. One in every nine deaths from heroin overdoses in the U.S. occurs in Ohio, leading the nation. In Lorain County, approximately 140 people died from heroin overdoses in 2016, according to The Chronicle-Telegram. On the other hand, according to The Columbus Dispatch, Ohio has lower rates of oxycodone and hydrocodone overdoses than many other states. Oxycodone and hydrocodone are prescription opioids, usually distributed in pill form. These painkillers are closely linked to heroin and can have similar effects on users when abused. While the relatively low rates of oxycodone and hydrocodone overdoses in Ohio are seemingly positive statistics, these low rates could be rel...

Philosophy Departments Lack Diversity

Jackie Brant, Contributing Writer

February 10, 2017

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

Despite having been warned about unequal gender distribution in the field, I was disappointed when I walked into my first day of Problems of Philosophy last semester and found few women in the room. While I’m admittedly only in my first year, my experience as a Philosophy major has shown me that, even at a school so focused on gender equality, philosophy as a field is still heavily dominated by men. This is largely true at all levels of education and across the world, from ancient times until now. Women as a group have yet to successfully break into the philosophy field. According to Humanities Indicator’s article “Gender Distribution of Degrees in Philosophy,” in 2014 only 28 percent of master’s degrees ...

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