The Oberlin Review

Berry, Jackson Team Up to Tackle Sustainable Agriculture, Assert Importance of Liberal Arts

Nora Kipnis

September 13, 2013

Filed under ARTS, Literature & Poetry

To kick off this year’s Convocation series, author Wendell Berry and acclaimed scientist Wes Jackson met in Finney Chapel on Tuesday, Sept. 10 to discuss environmentalism, sustainable agriculture and the role of a liberal arts education. Professor of Environmental Studies and Politics David Orr moderated the conversation, though he started out by saying that moderating a conversation between Berry and Jackson is “like choreographing a buffalo stampede.” The conversation was indeed forceful, with a level of connection and deep understanding between the two that was unstoppable. They frequently left the original topic of conversation behind to launch into a riff of inside jokes and passionate speeches on the environmental...

Potential Pipeline Promises Economic Growth Amid Environmental Concerns

Rachel Weinstein

September 6, 2013

Filed under Campus News, Community News, NEWS

College and community members face environmental risks as plans of hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, continue to move forward. For over a year, talk of a 250-mile natural gas pipeline between Hamilton Road and Route 20 has triggered a variety of responses from the Oberlin town and College community. In Ohio, legislatures passed a law allowing urban drilling in 2014, stripping communities of local control. Because of such legislation, cities and towns throughout the state carry little weight in decisions on installations of drilling sites.  Since the enactment of the law, over 90 wells have been cropped up throughout in the state. Despite its environmental implications, the prospect of fracking in Lorain...

A Hundred Trees Planted to Offset Carbon Emissions

Julia Herbst, News Editor

April 26, 2013

Filed under Campus News, Community News, NEWS

As part of continuing efforts to offset carbon emissions on campus, students and grounds crew members gathered last Saturday, April 20, to plant 100 trees in the former agricultural fields north of the solar panels. The event, organized by the Carbon Management Fund and co-sponsored by Ecolympics, is the second major tree-planting event this academic year. In November, a group of approximately 20 students planted 27 trees in Tappan Square. The Green EDGE Fund, which finances a variety of local environmental projects, also helped the Oberlin Rotary Club fund an additional 30 trees which were planted as part of the Club’s 75th anniversary celebration last fall. Dennis Greive, College grounds services manager, helped...

Ecolympics Underway, Expands Programming

Adiel Kaplan, Staff Writer

April 19, 2013

Filed under Campus News, NEWS

The glowing energy orbs around campus have been a little greener over the last two weeks as the Office of Environmental Sustainability kicks off its sixth annual Ecolympics. Ecolympics, which began April 5 and will run through April 26, is Oberlin’s three-week- long dorm energy-reduction competition, accompanied by daily events. This past Monday, a lecture titled “Environmental & LGBTQ Activism and the Bio-diversity of Sexuality” by eco- feminist activist and author Pattrice Jones was co-sponsored by the Drag Ball Committee, marking the first year of any such partnership. But it’s not just Drag Ball: this year Ecolympics is co-sponsoring events in partnership with organizations like Oberlin Shansi and...

Reporter Relays Experience with Fracking Industry

Madeline Stocker

April 12, 2013

Filed under Campus News, Community News, NEWS

Concerned students, professors and numerous community members gathered Monday, April 8, to hear Tim Wilber’s lecture on high-volume hydraulic fracturing, better known as fracking. Wilber, author and self-proclaimed “old-school journalist,” focused his lecture not only on anti-fracking techniques, but also on the social influences of hydraulic drilling. This lecture comes at a critical time, as many in Oberlin currently stand in opposition to state legislation prohibiting citizen control over the location of fracking sites. John Elder, co-chair of Kendal at Oberlin Residents Association Council, member of Communities for Safe and Sustainable Energy and former Oberlin trustees, put Wilber’s mention of lack...

Largest U.S. Climate Rally Heavily Attended by Oberlin Students

Duncan Standish

February 22, 2013

Filed under Campus News, Community News, NEWS

Some 50,000 people, including dozens of Oberlin students, gathered for the "Forward on Climate" rally in downtown Washington, D.C., last Sunday, Feb. 17, to urge President Obama to reject the permit for TransCanada to build the Keystone XL pipeline. The pipeline has been contentious since its proposal a few years ago, lying at the intersection of arguments about energy dependence, climate change and job creation. The environmental network 350 — as well as the Sierra Club, the Hip Hop Caucus and a host of other advocacy groups — organized the event. Former White House advisor Bill McKibben, 350.org founder Van Jones and others spoke near the Washington Monument; the crowd then marched to the White House. Zia...

College Wins Multiple Environmental Accolades

Elizabeth Dobbins, Staff Writer

February 8, 2013

Filed under Campus News, NEWS

This winter, the U.S. Green Building Council’s Center for Green Schools named Oberlin College the “Best 4-Year Higher Education Institution” in their second annual awards. The Center cited Oberlin’s installation of the largest solar array of any four-year liberal arts college, its collaboration with the city of Oberlin to become a climate-positive community, as well as student-driven initiatives such as the Big Swap, the Responsible Investment Organization and the Recycled Products Co-op. “Something that I’m particularly impressed with at Oberlin is the creative initiative of students to create really exciting resource conservation projects like the Fresh Swap and the Free Store,” said Amanda Jacir,...

Too Much Left Unsaid in College Energy Plan

November 9, 2012

Filed under Letters to the Editors, OPINIONS

As the EPA forces the College to close the current coal-fired boilers that power the Central Heating Plant, the College has been forced to make a decision about what kind of energy future it wishes to create. All indicators suggest that the College will be pursuing natural gas boilers, despite major student opposition over the ethics of fossil fuels and fracked natural gas in particular. In response to these concerns, the College has created a process through which student concerns can be voiced. This process, as demonstrated by the “Where are we and how did we get here?” talk on Monday, is not a process where students, faculty and staff can share their concerns, but instead a way for the College to legitimize a...

Electric Car Greener Alternative to Gas-Powered Vehicles

Electric Car Greener Alternative to Gas-Powered Vehicles

April 20, 2012

The City of Cleveland, Cuyahoga County and Clean Fuels Ohio hosted a workshop and showcase from 9:30 to 3:00 today discussing city planning for electric vehicles and the newest models of electric cars by Chevy and Nissan. Despite reports of the technology’s death due in large part to oil lobbyists and car companies as documented in “Who Killed the Electric Car?”, many have kept their faith alive in an alternative to gas-powered vehicles. One such believer, John Peterson, director of Oberlin’s...

“Frack Yes!” Talk Incites Protest

“Frack Yes!” Talk Incites Protest

April 13, 2012

Hydraulic fracturing advocates and opponents met Wednesday, April 11, for a screening of Gasland followed by a lecture titled “Frack Yes!” given by Daniel Simmons, director of regulatory and state affairs at the Institute for Energy Research. Students in the audience waved red flags in silent protest and snickered audibly throughout Simmons’ speech. Associate Dean of Student Life Adrian Bautista at one point stopped the speaker and implored the audience to express their dissent within preset...

Ecolympics Encourages Energy Conservation, Competition

Joseph Dilworth, Staff Writer

April 6, 2012

Filed under Campus News, NEWS

Along with group showers, ice cream socials and dorm rivalries, the Ecolympics have returned. The competition began Tuesday and will run for a total of three weeks, during which dorms will battle in three separate categories that include electricity reduction, water reduction and attendance at Ecolympics events. “The goals are to engage, educate, motivate and empower students to take control of their resource use in dorms and to think more actively about the ways in which the personal and collective choices that they make affect the environment,” said John Petersen, associate professor of Environmental Studies and Biology. Dorms that finish first in each of the categories will be rewarded with a commemorative...

Editorial: In Our Backyard? No Fracking Way!

The Editorial Board

March 9, 2012

Filed under Editorials, OPINIONS

One thing is on some restless students’ minds as springtime rolls in. By most accounts, it’s a dirty business. It seems like everywhere around us people are doing it — right in our own muddy Ohio backyard. Let’s talk about fracking. The process of induced hydraulic fracturing is getting energy companies increasingly hot and bothered about the prospect of untapped natural gas reserves, particularly in the Marcellus Shale that extends across a large portion of New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and eastern Ohio. Despite what would seem like a love-at-first-sight relationship for anyone interested in cheap energy, questions about fracking’s safety, environmental impact and effect on the continuing U.S. reliance...

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