Established 1874.

The Oberlin Review

Parking Policy Threatens Student Safety

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

September 22, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Upon my arrival to Oberlin as a first-year, I was told that the only designated parking areas for first-years are located next to Mercy Allen Hospital. First-years who park their cars anywhere else are subject to fines of up to $80, plus towing expenses. The fact that the only designated parking for newbies on campus is the farthest lot from campus and most first-year dorms is extremely disadvantageous to first-years. The justification I was given by Safety and Security regarding the inconvenience of first-year parking was that it might discourage first-years from bringing cars to campus. For a college that is so focused on the environment and has limited parking, this would have been an acceptable justification â€...

Harvey, Irma Highlight Need to Address Climate Change

Nathan Carpenter, Opinions Editor

September 15, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Over the past weeks, evidence has mounted that the future of the world with respect to climate change is bleak. In the United States alone, Houston and Florida have been leveled at the hands of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, respectively. Other tropical storms have veered off at the last moment, barely missing land. While avoiding these additional disasters has doubtlessly saved lives, there is still little cause for hope. The reality is that the state of the environment is declining sharply and rapidly, and the consequences of that deterioration are severe. If effective action is going to be taken on climate change, it must be taken now — assuming that our window has not already closed. It was terrifying, then, wh...

Harvey Hits Both Texas, Economy

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

September 8, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

On Aug. 26, I watched from Oberlin as Hurricane Harvey — a storm that would go down as one of the most devastating natural disasters in Texan history — destroyed my hometown of Houston. Harvey was so destructive because it was slow-moving; the Category 4 hurricane remained a storm up to 117 hours after landfall, a state record, and hovered over Texas for four days straight. The total damage is currently predicted to be between $70 and $90 billion; however, estimates have climbed as high as $190 billion. The destruction Harvey has caused to residents of Texas is devastating. Millions of people’s homes have been irreversibly destroyed, thousands of people are injured, and many roads and bridges are in desperate...

First Years Find Support Through PAL Program

Nathan Carpenter, Opinions Editor

September 1, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Many Obies remember their first-year orientation experiences well. Mine was hot, sweaty, and overwhelming — most people who I’ve spoken to can relate. There was a lot of information thrown at me in a short amount of time, and most of it didn’t stick. Nearly all of the valuable learning experiences during my first semester came as a result of relationships with older students that I was lucky enough to develop. However, that support system was not guaranteed to me, and I cannot imagine what it would have been like to navigate Oberlin and living away from home for the first time without it. Clearly, there was a leadership void that needed to be filled, particularly at a time when Oberlin’s finances a...

Students, Senate Must Work Together

Meg Parker, Contributing Writer

September 1, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS, Student Senate

This article is part of the Review’s Student Senate column. In an effort to increase communication and transparency, Student Senators will provide personal perspectives on recent events on campus and in the community. This week at my hall meeting, my RA asked what mattered to us. My response was, “Change, and the ability of people to make change together.” I’m currently a member of Oberlin’s interim Student Senate. As I shared during my hall meeting, I thought about how collaboration is an integral part of Senate’s work. As Vice Chair, I spent the past two semesters learning about Oberlin through my work, and I want to share reflections with you from my first term on Senate. Collective chang...

Bill Combats Imaginary Voter Fraud

Nathan Carpenter, Contributing Opinions Editor

April 28, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

In December, I wrote in the Review that the election of President Donald Trump and Republicans nationwide signaled an impending battle for voting rights across the country (“Voting by Mail Removes Barriers to Polls,” Dec. 2). Now, that fight has come to Ohio. The 12 members of the Ohio House’s Government Accountability and Oversight Committee voted House Bill 41 out of committee along partisan lines Wednesday. It will now go to a vote of the entire State House, where Republicans hold an overwhelming majority. The intent of HB 41 is to restrict the ease of in-person early voting in Ohio, ostensibly with the goal of reducing voter fraud. The state’s current early voting policy is that photo ID is not requ...

Oberlin Should Seek Out Local Apparel Suppliers

Jackie Brant, Columnist

April 28, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

As the Review reported last week, an investigation by the Worker Rights Consortium released last December revealed that Nike had been using a sweatshop as a supplier for its collegiate clothing, violating its anti-sweatshop agreement with the College. As a college dedicated to social justice, Oberlin has a Sweatshop-Free Apparel Code of Purchasing, meaning that the College refuses to buy from businesses that use sweatshops in their production process. Sweatshops are wildly unjust to workers, as they may force employees to work unreasonable hours in unfit conditions, pay less than minimum wage with no benefits and may use child labor. Unfortunately, most major sports apparel brands have been tainted by labor malpract...

Trump Reverts to Republican Orthodoxy

Ben Silverman, Columnist

April 28, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Former Breitbart News editor and President Donald Trump’s right-hand man Steve Bannon was ousted from his role on the National Security Council on April 5 and has continued to fall in standing in Trump’s inner circle since then, according to reports from The Hill and Vanity Fair, among others. Recent events have large implications for the remainder of the Trump presidency, as Jared Kushner, Ivanka Trump and other establishment Republicans have replaced Bannon at the president’s side. This changing of the guard has influenced Donald’s recent budget proposals, which include a tax cut disproportionately benefiting the wealthy and a lack of funding for his proposed border wall. The divides within Donald’s circle o...

Limited Number of Humanities Classes Pigeonholes Students

Jackie Brant, Columnist

April 21, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Registration season is a stressful time for many students. We worry about when our registration slot will be, if we will get into the classes we need and, if we don’t, if we will be able to successfully navigate add/drop period. As a first-year this spring, I had the second-to-last registration window. By the time I got to pick my classes, there was only one class with spots available in each of my majors, Philosophy and Politics, one of which required a prerequisite that I did not have. Though everyone reassures students that we can fix our schedules during add/drop, that consolation does not save us the stress of waiting months for add/drop over the summer. It also never guarantees that we will get our...

Trump Recklessly Tempts War

Russell Jaffe, Columnist

April 21, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

International tensions are on the rise as North Korea and the United States trade increasingly threatening demonstrations of military power. In one deliberate provocation, President Donald Trump supposedly sent an aircraft carrier to the Korean peninsula in a move that North Korea condemned as “reckless.” However, on Saturday’s “Day of the Sun,” a festival celebrating the birthday of Kim Il-Sung, North Korea’s founder, Kim Jong Un responded by publicly flaunting his military arsenal, and is currently rumored to be planning further nuclear tests to advance North Korea’s place in the arms race. For the first time since the Cold War, World War III looms as a serious threat on the horizon. It is difficult...

PRSM Workshops Exacerbate Hierarchy

Jackie Brant, Columnist

April 14, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

It has become common practice for colleges and universities across the U.S. to mandate sexual misconduct workshops for incoming students. At Oberlin, all new students are required to attend the first round of Preventing and Responding to Sexual Misconduct workshops, and all athletes are required to attend the second, which is also open to the entire community. The mandatory first workshop is called The Essentials, and the second workshop is called Bystander Intervention. Together, these two workshops are meant to inform students about the importance and language of consent. Overall, the PRSM workshops are crucial to the social atmosphere at Oberlin. I have heard stories and personally experienced instances in which...

LA Legislature Misses Mark on HIV

Jackie Brant, Columnist

April 7, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

In a fight to end the stigmatization of HIV and AIDS, Democratic lawmakers in Los Angeles are seeking to pass legislation that would reduce the charge for not telling your partner that you have HIV before engaging in unprotected sex from a felony to a misdemeanor. This law would also apply to situations in which HIV positive individuals donate blood or semen. While the stigmatization of HIV and AIDS is an issue that needs to be addressed, the lawmakers’ proposal is not a suitable answer to the problem. Proponents of the bill argue that with the advancements of modern medicine, HIV is treatable. Currently, there are 18.2 million people worldwide on medications for the illness. These medications are generally effective,...

Established 1874.