Established 1874.

The Oberlin Review

Whiteness of Student Publications Threatens Integrity

Kameron Dunbar, Columnist

December 1, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

When’s the last time you saw a Nazi at the grocery store? If not yesterday, maybe you saw a picture of one in The New York Times’ profile of Tony Hovater — bonafide and self-avowed white nationalist. In their article “A Voice of Hate in America’s Heartland,” originally titled “In America’s Heartland, Nazi Sympathizer Next Door,” the Times willingly gave a white supremacist an uncontested platform for his unabashedly racist views. When faced with criticism over the style of reporting and lapses made in nearly all respects, the Times defended their coverage of bigoted Hovater in “Readers Accuse Us of Normalizing Nazi Sympathizer, We Respond.” They responded, and responded poorly. “Our reporter and hi...

Mulvaney Appointment Threatens CFPB

Xander Kott, Columnist

December 1, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

A partisan firestorm was ignited Nov. 24 when Richard Cordray resigned from his position as director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The CFPB is a component of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, which Congress passed in the wake of the Great Recession. The CFPB was envisioned to prevent the kinds of cheating and fraud perpetrated by financial institutions that led to the crisis in the first place. Under Cordray’s leadership, the CFPB caused a number of problems for corrupt banks on Wall Street. It returned $12 billion stolen by banks and credit card companies to the hands of consumers. In a high profile Sept. 2016 case, the CFPB handed Wells Fargo a $100 million fine f...

Winter Term Changes Infantilize Students

Kameron Dunbar, Columnist

November 17, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Many students have not yet started the registration process for Winter Term, but many will find themselves amazed by the dramatic new changes implemented by the Winter Term Committee. Winter Term is one of the most unique facets of the Oberlin experience — a program that certainly attracts students to the College. Students can research, play, work, or pursue other activities to extend their learning outside of the academic course-load. Everyone around here knows that Obies run the gamut in terms of projects. From learning how to cook to surveying the Nile River in Cairo, Obies do it all. And we’re thoughtful about it. While some students use Winter Term as a time to recoup from the stress of college life, many of...

Students, Senate Vital to Productive Relationship

Nathan Carpenter, Opinions Editor

November 17, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

In discussions about the importance of engaging with elected representatives, our most local and available representatives are often left out of the conversation. Student Senate is a representative body, elected at-large by Oberlin students, tasked with working with both students and administration to represent the voices of the student body. Unfortunately, Senate’s potential to advocate on behalf of its constituents is often overlooked by students, which results in perceptions that Senate’s work is not particularly important or relevant. This perspective misses the mark. Student Senate works on a broad range of issues on campus, and though many of those issues largely play out behind the scenes, senators them...

Accessibility to Philosophy Will Positively Affect Field

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

November 10, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

The role of college students in the Oberlin community has long been hotly debated. So, too, has been the lack of the diversity in the field of philosophy. Though these two issues may seem unrelated, the new Philosophy in the Schools Practicum has made a great start in addressing both. Spearheaded by Chair of the Philosophy Department Katherine Thomson-Jones, the PHITS class is a course in both philosophy and education. Every week, the 16 Oberlin students enrolled in PHITS go to Eastwood Elementary School in Oberlin and teach three classrooms of second graders and one of first graders. There, the college students read a children’s book, like Morris the Moose or The Giving Tree, to the class and then facilitate a phi...

PAL Represents Best, Worst of Oberlin

Kameron Dunbar, Columnist

November 10, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

I never had a PAL, but I certainly could have used one as a fledgling first-year. Oberlin has a lot of resources available for students, many of which are difficult to access if you don’t know they exist. Fortunately, I had the iconic Alex Cunningham as a mentor to lead me in the right direction and keep me on my path. Not everyone has such a positive experience — students are often left to fend for themselves without guidance from peers. One positive thing that came out of the College’s recent Strategic Plan was an acknowledgement of the need for reform in Oberlin’s advising system. Putting it bluntly, students shared a common feeling of disappointment in Oberlin’s pre-major advising mechanisms. This is ho...

Parking Policy Threatens Student Safety

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

September 22, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Upon my arrival to Oberlin as a first-year, I was told that the only designated parking areas for first-years are located next to Mercy Allen Hospital. First-years who park their cars anywhere else are subject to fines of up to $80, plus towing expenses. The fact that the only designated parking for newbies on campus is the farthest lot from campus and most first-year dorms is extremely disadvantageous to first-years. The justification I was given by Safety and Security regarding the inconvenience of first-year parking was that it might discourage first-years from bringing cars to campus. For a college that is so focused on the environment and has limited parking, this would have been an acceptable justification ...

Harvey, Irma Highlight Need to Address Climate Change

Nathan Carpenter, Opinions Editor

September 15, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Over the past weeks, evidence has mounted that the future of the world with respect to climate change is bleak. In the United States alone, Houston and Florida have been leveled at the hands of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, respectively. Other tropical storms have veered off at the last moment, barely missing land. While avoiding these additional disasters has doubtlessly saved lives, there is still little cause for hope. The reality is that the state of the environment is declining sharply and rapidly, and the consequences of that deterioration are severe. If effective action is going to be taken on climate change, it must be taken now — assuming that our window has not already closed. It was terrifying, then, wh...

Harvey Hits Both Texas, Economy

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

September 8, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

On Aug. 26, I watched from Oberlin as Hurricane Harvey — a storm that would go down as one of the most devastating natural disasters in Texan history — destroyed my hometown of Houston. Harvey was so destructive because it was slow-moving; the Category 4 hurricane remained a storm up to 117 hours after landfall, a state record, and hovered over Texas for four days straight. The total damage is currently predicted to be between $70 and $90 billion; however, estimates have climbed as high as $190 billion. The destruction Harvey has caused to residents of Texas is devastating. Millions of people’s homes have been irreversibly destroyed, thousands of people are injured, and many roads and bridges are in desperate...

First Years Find Support Through PAL Program

Nathan Carpenter, Opinions Editor

September 1, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Many Obies remember their first-year orientation experiences well. Mine was hot, sweaty, and overwhelming — most people who I’ve spoken to can relate. There was a lot of information thrown at me in a short amount of time, and most of it didn’t stick. Nearly all of the valuable learning experiences during my first semester came as a result of relationships with older students that I was lucky enough to develop. However, that support system was not guaranteed to me, and I cannot imagine what it would have been like to navigate Oberlin and living away from home for the first time without it. Clearly, there was a leadership void that needed to be filled, particularly at a time when Oberlin’s finances a...

Students, Senate Must Work Together

Meg Parker, Contributing Writer

September 1, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS, Student Senate

This article is part of the Review’s Student Senate column. In an effort to increase communication and transparency, Student Senators will provide personal perspectives on recent events on campus and in the community. This week at my hall meeting, my RA asked what mattered to us. My response was, “Change, and the ability of people to make change together.” I’m currently a member of Oberlin’s interim Student Senate. As I shared during my hall meeting, I thought about how collaboration is an integral part of Senate’s work. As Vice Chair, I spent the past two semesters learning about Oberlin through my work, and I want to share reflections with you from my first term on Senate. Collective chang...

Bill Combats Imaginary Voter Fraud

Nathan Carpenter, Contributing Opinions Editor

April 28, 2017

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

In December, I wrote in the Review that the election of President Donald Trump and Republicans nationwide signaled an impending battle for voting rights across the country (“Voting by Mail Removes Barriers to Polls,” Dec. 2). Now, that fight has come to Ohio. The 12 members of the Ohio House’s Government Accountability and Oversight Committee voted House Bill 41 out of committee along partisan lines Wednesday. It will now go to a vote of the entire State House, where Republicans hold an overwhelming majority. The intent of HB 41 is to restrict the ease of in-person early voting in Ohio, ostensibly with the goal of reducing voter fraud. The state’s current early voting policy is that photo ID is not requ...

Established 1874.