The Oberlin Review

Speak Up, Support Survivors, Vote in November

Ilana Foggle, Columnist

October 12, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Leading up to the midterm elections, Ilana Foggle will be writing articles for the Review about local candidates and issues to increase awareness of Oberlin and Ohio politics. Editor’s Note: This article contains mention of sexual assault, sexual abuse, domestic abuse, and victim-shaming. Meet Jim Jordan. Republican Jim Jordan has been the representative for Ohio’s 4th Congressional District since his election in 2006. In 2015, Jim Jordan founded the House Freedom Caucus, a group of the most active conservative and libertarian members of Congress. Since his election, Jim Jordan has voted against reauthorizing the Violence Against Women Act and funding enforcement of equal pay for women. He has voted to r...

Oberlin Students Must Evaluate Their Place in Local Elections

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

October 5, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

As critical midterm elections approach, Oberlin students need to again consider where and how we will vote. Many of us are transient residents both in Oberlin and Ohio more generally; thus, we need to think about what our role in these communities should be. Consider Issue 11, which will be on Oberlin’s ballot this November. It’s the first phase of a levy that would consolidate Oberlin City Schools into a single building by 2025, increasing the tax burden of many Oberlin homeowners. Because of its impact on local taxes, Issue 11 is highly controversial. Many Oberlin residents feel that their taxes are already too high, and that has driven people out of town in the past. A significant percentage of the city’s...

Hello Safety, Goodbye Security: An Unexpected Budget Cut

Madisyn Mettenburg, Production Editor

September 21, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Like any first-year reluctant to abandon the air-conditioned luxury of their home, Campus Safety — formerly known as Safety and Security — has certainly been dragging its feet on its move to Dascomb Hall. While no one quite knows when they will move into Fourth Meal’s decrepit shell, even less is known about its sudden rebranding. Why the switch from Safety and Security to merely Campus Safety? Is it because now, in the midst of a budget crisis, “security” is the latest tenant to be sacrificed at the deficit’s jeweled altar? And what acronym can we possibly revere now, with the snappy “S-’n’-S” struck down alongside it? Students living in South Hall have been some of the first to feel the effect...

Oberlin Must Take Next Step in Sexual Misconduct Prevention

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

September 7, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Editor’s Note: This article contains discussion of sexual misconduct and sexual assault. As the school year begins, it is imperative that students keep in mind the prevalence of sexual misconduct on campus and do what they can to minimize it in our community. Over 50 percent of sexual assaults on college campuses happen between August and November. Around 11 percent of all college students will be victims of sexual assault during their college careers, and 70 percent of campus survivors know their perpetrator prior to their assault. Further, 23 percent of women in college report that they have experienced some sort of nonconsensual sexual contact. More than 50 percent of these victims do not report the act, as th...

DeCafé Anti-Theft Rules Mirror Stop-and-Frisk Policies

Kameron Dunbar, Columnist

April 20, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

In 2013, former United States District Court Judge for the Southern District of New York Shira Scheindlin ruled that New York City’s stop-and-frisk practice was unconstitutional. Specifically, she ruled that it violated the equal protection clause under the Fourteenth Amendment. What exactly was New York City’s stop-and-frisk? It was a New York Police Department policy that allowed officers to detain, question, and search pedestrians under the auspices of “reasonable suspicion” that the pedestrian was involved or implicated in a crime. Did it reduce crime? Unlikely. There’s little evidence suggesting that stop-and-frisk policing tactics affect crime rates. While New York City has gotten safer since 2002, ...

Oberlin Should Focus on Sustainability in Future Legacy

Johan Cavert

April 20, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS, Student Senate

This article is part of the Review’s Student Senate column. In an effort to increase communication and transparency, student senators will provide personal perspectives on recent events on campus and in the community. The General Faculty Council has decided who will serve on the Academic Administrative Program Review Steering Committee, which will soon be announced to the rest of the campus. At such a critical moment, it is important to make time for nuanced reflection about the trajectory, values, and vision of our institution — something Student Senate has focused on this semester. During the student-trustee forums last month, one trustee convincingly asserted that Oberlin was not facing anything as dramatic as ba...

Students Should Engage in Secretary of State Race

Nathan Carpenter, Columnist

April 20, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Almost immediately following President Donald Trump’s election in November 2016, political commentators and activists — particularly those on the left — turned their attention toward the 2018 elections. We now find ourselves just six months out from those elections, in which every seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, several key seats in the Senate, and many vital state-level offices will be fiercely contested. As usual, Ohioans find themselves in the thick of the political fray. Many key elections will take place in the state this November, including those for the governor’s mansion, where term-limited Governor John Kasich cannot seek reelection, and for progressive Senator Sherrod Brown’s seat, w...

Martin Luther King’s Dream Continues to Be Misrepresented

Kameron Dunbar, Columnist

April 6, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a man on a noble quest for justice, righteousness, and peace. Many pundits, politicians, and public intellectuals alike find themselves living in his radiant light and quoting some of his awe-inspiring prose — and deservingly so. While King deserves every button, refrigerator magnet, greeting card, and Twitter banner made in his honor, he also deserves a fair and honest portrayal of his radical activism. As the nation pauses on the 50th anniversary of his assassination, it is imperative that we all think of King’s legacy and interrogate how it is represented to the public. Earlier this year, The New York Times columnist David Brooks invoked King’s famous “dream” in a call to move A...

Focus on Student Empowerment Crucial for Success

León Pescador

April 6, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

This article is part of the Review’s Student Senate column. In an effort to increase communication and transparency, Student Senators will provide personal perspectives on recent events on campus and in the community. Student empowerment continues as a driving force for Senate this semester. This year, we appointed dozens of students to general faculty committees, such as the influential Educational Policies and Planning Committee. This semester, students gained co-chairmanship of the Student Life Committee. The effect of student appointments to committees is twofold: first, students who demonstrate passion and dedication to an issue can better represent and articulate their interests. Second, fewer senators on co...

Community Should Reflect Upon History of College Spaces

Kameron Dunbar, Columnist

March 9, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Editor’s Note: This article contains mentions of sexual assault. I walk into North Hall every day. Most days, I forget that the official building name is “Langston Hall,” in honor of John Mercer Langston. That name may not be familiar to many, but this one may be: James Mercer Langston Hughes. Yes, that Langston Hughes. Langston Hughes was the grandson of Charles Henry Langston. Charles Henry Langston and his brother Gideon were the first two Black students admitted to Oberlin College. Charles and Gideon were John’s older brothers. John Mercer Langston was Langston Hughes’ great uncle. While John Mercer Langston’s name may not carry much global recognition, his life is a vital piece of Oberlin College’s ...

Students Must Protect Entirety of Oberlin, Not Just Specific Parts

Kameron Dunbar, Columnist

March 2, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

This article is part of the Review’s Student Senate column. In an effort to increase communication and transparency, Student Senators will provide personal perspectives on recent events on campus and in the community. President Carmen Ambar delivered her 10th comprehensive presentation on Oberlin’s financial futures on Wednesday, particularly the challenges and opportunities therein. King 306 was packed with students, with audible laughs and sighs throughout the event’s duration. Personally, I was extremely excited to see such an awesome turnout. Years of frustration, coupled with an inclination to interrogate institutions, have left the student body suspicious of practically anything that involves administra...

Lack of Gun Control Puts U.S. Education System at Risk

Nathan Carpenter, Columnist

March 2, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

In the more than five years since the December 2012 mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, CT, it has become clear that gun control in the United States will not be achieved through the avenues that we have already explored. Congress has proven that it has no interest in challenging the National Rifle Association, even at the expense of students’ lives. Students are now taking matters into their own hands — and not just the survivors of the horrific Parkland shooting, but countless others around the country as well. Mass school walkouts in support of gun control are being organized in one of the most compelling and powerful instances of student-led action in my lifetime. Now, schools must ch...

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