The Oberlin Review

Inadequate Facilities Unsafe, Inaccessible For Disabled Students

Zoë Luh, Contributing Writer

April 19, 2019

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

 My most poignant memory from Orientation Week was calling my best friend crying because I thought I would have to leave this school. Classes hadn’t even started yet. There was no academic pressure, and there were many opportunities for social exploration. The reason I thought I had to leave Oberlin was because of its lack of accessibility. On the third day of orientation, I remember entering Hall Auditorium for the mandatory play, The OC. Even though the building isn’t as old as others on campus, it wasn’t designed with the needs of people like me in mind. As soon as I entered Hall Auditorium, I could smell mold. Mold is an environmental toxin that has especially adverse effects on people with chronic ill...

Students Must Address Entitlement, Be More Respectful, Appreciative of Hourly Employees

Marisa Kim, Contributing Writer

April 19, 2019

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

 Dear Obies: I do not wake up at 6 a.m. every Wednesday to clean up your messes.  I have worked for Campus Dining Services in Wilder DeCafé since my second week on campus. During my first semester, I worked as a stocker, and this semester I work as a line clerk. In that time, I’ve witnessed a consistent trend at Oberlin, which can best be encompassed by a recent exchange.  The checkout line in DeCafé is always longest during the 10-minute transition periods between classes. Last Wednesday — with just a few minutes till 9 a.m. — the line wrapped around the store to the beverage fridges while I was manning the sole open register. Whilst trying to escape the line as quickly as possible, a student spilled h...

Strange Acquisitions: How We Got The Carnegie Building

Isabelle Smith, Contributing Writer

April 19, 2019

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

 Many Oberlin students are aware of Oberlin’s rich history. Some even first heard about Oberlin in their high school history books. However, few students are aware of the captivating stories that Oberlin’s physical buildings themselves hold.  In a previous Review article, College senior Kameron Dunbar detailed the interesting history behind Langston Hall and urged readers to discover not only the stories of how Oberlin acquired these buildings, but also the reasoning behind the names of certain buildings (“Community Should Reflect Upon History of College Spaces,” March 9, 2018). Another example of a building with a very interesting, yet mostly forgotten history is the Carnegie Building at the corner of W...

Wind Farms Do Pose Health, Procedural Justice Concerns

Nathan Carpenter, Editor-in-Chief

April 12, 2019

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

 At a recent Republican Party fundraiser, President Donald Trump made headlines for yet another bizarre, unprompted statement, remarking that the noise from wind turbines has the potential to cause cancer. As many scientists, journalists, and politicians on both sides of the aisle immediately pointed out, there is no evidence to corroborate this claim. Several Democratic presidential candidates chimed in, mocking Trump’s ignorance. Iowa’s senators, both of whom are Republican, weighed in against the president, as representatives of a state significantly invested in wind energy. Even Kellyanne Conway’s husband, George, got a piece of the action, adding “Windmill cancer survivor” to his Twitter bio. While t...

We Need To Fix Course Registration — Here’s How

David Mathisson, Contributing Writer

April 12, 2019

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

 Course registration is obviously not the highlight of anybody’s college experience — and it’s especially bad at Oberlin. Course selection starts with a mess of overloaded but mandatory courses thanks to a large number of highly specific requirements. Faculty replace prerequisites with consent barriers so that qualified students are held at the mercy of overworked professors’ ability to respond to emails.  Then, when students are unable to get into the courses they want because of consent barriers, they are forced to enroll in courses they aren’t actually going to take. That forces students with later registration times to enroll in classes they don’t plan to take, ultimately occupying spots in classes...

Reflections on Food and Eating Through the Lens of Julia Child

Katie Lucey, Contributing Writer

April 12, 2019

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

 Those who know me well know that I harbor an unfettered love for the legendary American chef Julia Child. I plowed through her memoir, My Life in France, and still occasionally watch old tapings of her television program, The French Chef. I paid tribute to her culinary greatness when I saw her legendary kitchen on display at the National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. Though I did not offer a stick of butter at the altar of her extra-tall kitchen counter like Julie in Julie & Julia, I nevertheless stood in reverence of the undeniable uniqueness of one of America’s most famous culinary geniuses. Child wrote with incredible levity — both in her cookbooks and her memoirs — and her TV show h...

Discussions Regarding Dining Changes Must Include Student Input, Voices

David Mathisson, Contributing Writer

April 5, 2019

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

The Office of Residential Education sent an email to all rising juniors March 19 notifying students that previously promised meal plan options would no longer be offered. Instead, the office planned to limit them to more expensive meal plans that provide fewer options to students. Concerned about the impact on low- and middle-income students, a small group of passionate student activists planned a boycott in response. Later that day, because of the accessibility concerns, I joined as an organizer. I created a food donation plan to ensure every participant would get enough to eat during the boycott, regardless of income. I’d like to thank Vice President and Dean of Students Meredith Raimondo and the Dean of Students...

AAPR Process Must Value, Respect All College Employees

Jae Muth, Contributing Writer

April 5, 2019

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

The areas of recommendation first publicly presented by the Academic and Administrative Program Review steering committee on March 13 and 14 have exposed clear divisions between different parts of the Oberlin community. Students, faculty, staff, and administrators each face a challenging set of potential changes that, to this point, have only been offered to the campus community in blurry terms.  The vague statements — veiled in large part by the language of development, progress, and nominal references to Oberlin’s ethical standards — have incited confusion, misunderstandings, and difficult conversations among the people who attend and work at Oberlin. Yet, student discourse largely seems to ignore the most...

The Voices of Students, Organizers, and Senators Matter More Than Ever

Serena Zets, Contributing Writer

March 15, 2019

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

Disclaimer: In this opinion piece, though I am speaking about my experiences as a student senator, I am discussing these occurrences as a student — not as a senator.  The actions of last week deeply frustrated, appalled, and saddened me. I acknowledge that Student Senate’s March 11 statement has played a part in derailing campus political dialogue. However, I wish to move forward and discuss a different outcome of Senate’s statement, one that has been intensely personal and upsetting. I have accepted a significant amount of the fallout over Senate’s statement, but I am unsure why it has been a burden that I individually have had to bear. While it was my job to deliver the message to the student body, I was ...

The Catholic Church Doesn’t Deserve an Apology

David Mathisson, Contributing Writer

March 15, 2019

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

After Pete Davidson compared the Catholic Church to R. Kelly on last week’s Saturday Night Live, Church leaders — including Pope Francis — demanded a public apology. “Apparently, the only acceptable bias these days is against the Catholic Church,” they said in a statement. It’s ironic that the Church — which has long opposed liberal policies like promoting LGBTQ rights and a woman’s right to choose — is suddenly up in arms over Pete Davidson’s use of free speech. They had no problem with free speech when the Pope claimed the institution of the family was under attack by marriage equality advocates, for which the LGBTQ community never got an apology. In its overblown response, the Church tries ...

Student Senate Must Be Proactive in Regaining Student Trust

Ruby Anderson, Contributing Writer

March 15, 2019

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS, Uncategorized

On Friday, March 8, a group of around 40 students gathered in Tappan Square. Our plan was to disrupt a trustee luncheon and read a statement expressing our concerns about the Academic and Administrative Program Review, the current budget crisis, and a general lack of transparency and meaningful incorporation of student voices in decision making processes at Oberlin. When we arrived at The Hotel at Oberlin, we were immediately surrounded by Campus Safety officers and administrators, who blocked access to the stairs leading up to the luncheon, causing the “accessibility” concerns raised in Student Senate’s March 11 email. I was able to gain access to the luncheon and read our statement in full to the attendees,...

Ariana Grande’s Music Video Perpetuates Queer Stereotypes, Tropes

Aly Fogel, Contributing Writer

March 8, 2019

Filed under Commentary, OPINIONS

I am tired of watching gross misrepresentations of queer women in entertainment. I find myself mentally reminding the artists involved in these works, “My queerness is not a publicity stunt. My queerness is not for your straight self-promotion. And my queerness is definitely not your personal fetish.” So when I first watched Ariana Grande’s music video, “break up with your girlfriend, i’m bored,” which has been criticized for its staged girl-on-girl kiss, I was not surprised to encounter the queer tropes I have become all too familiar with. However, I was surprised to find a strange new form of appropriation of the queer experience by a straight artist: using female queerness as straight girl empowerment...

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