The Oberlin Review

Bernie Sanders: The 2020 Candidate Nobody Asked For

Henry Hicks, Contributing Writer

February 22, 2019

The 2020 presidential election cycle has officially begun, with upwards of ten candidates already declaring their bids for the Democratic nomination. This deep pool includes current U.S. senators, entrepreneurs, local-level politicians, and more. Newer faces of the Democratic Party, such as Senators Kamala Harris and Cory Booker, have managed to generate much excitement, asserting themselves as candidates to be taken seriously despite claiming little name recognition. However, they’ll soon be tested by progressive powerhouse Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who announced his second presidential bid last Tuesday. Emerging into a majority of the public’s eye only a few years ago, Sanders positioned himself as...

Sanders’ Progressivism Offers Hope for 2020

Christo Hayes, Production Editor

February 22, 2019

The Bern has returned. Millionaires and billionaires nationwide are on life support. Cory Booker is reportedly pleading with his Big Pharma donors to keep a low profile. Barack Obama has been spotted on a coffee date with Joe Biden, who looked close to tears as 44 told him his monopoly on the “favorite grandpa” title is over. Beto O’Rourke has been sighted at a skatepark, brooding and hitting kick-flips. And the president’s White House staffers tell us he may declare DEFCON 4. Hyperbole aside — though it wouldn’t be shocking if the nation’s 1 percent started seeing their doctors more frequently — Senator Bernie Sanders’ emergence in the 2020 presidential field is exciting. Thus far, left-wing presidential...

Prestissimo is Back: It Needs to Stay That Way

Sage Vouse, Webmaster

February 22, 2019

Every three months or so, it comes time for Oberlin College and Conservatory students to select classes for the upcoming semester. This is a gratifying but precise process; the breadth demands particular attention be paid to future course offerings. Whether a student is looking to fill their quantitative formal reasoning requirements or simply expand their knowledge beyond their comfort zones, everyone is searching for something. There are several ways to go about this search, two of which — Acalog ACMS™, hosted on the Oberlin website, and OberView/Presto — involve searching courses by keywords. Then, students determine which courses are offered at which times, and determine what fits and what doesn’t. What’s...

Terrell’s Accomplishments Should Be Highlighted, Not Overlooked

Shannon Silberhorn, Contributing Writer

February 22, 2019

Like any institution, Oberlin’s history and commitment to progressivism has both dramatic highs and sharp lows. Part of why I chose Oberlin as a high school student was that it was the first college to support women and Black students in pursuing higher education. As a College senior, I’ve chosen to focus my Religion capstone on Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954), because I was interested in the way our institutional history often excludes the contributions of Terrell and other Black women who graduated from Oberlin. In addition to renaming the main library after Terrell, I agree with Azariah Smith Root Director of Libraries Alexia Hudson-Ward that we should do more to educate students about her history in order for...

People Should Treat Every Day Like It’s Valentine’s Day

Maddi Kimball, Contributing Writer

February 15, 2019

This year, I swore I wouldn’t do anything for Valentine’s Day. Not because I am anti-Valentine’s Day, or because Cupid skipped over me this year, but because I find myself wondering what the point of Valentine’s Day truly is. Prioritizing someone for a hot second, and then falling back into a monotonous cycle of pushing them aside until an anniversary comes around? Take it from me, a girl who was so fed up with this cycle in her own relationship that she chose Valentine’s Day of all days to end a relationship — which was rather convenient, as chocolate was half-off the next day. I don’t know about you, but Valentine’s Day seemed so much more palatable as a small child, when it meant that you made cute...

Students Should Recognize Ohioans as Neighbors, Not Just Voters

Elmo Tumbokon, Contributing Writer

February 15, 2019

Dolores Huerta, a co-founder of the United Farm Workers and organizer of the Delano Grape Strikes, reminded a crying audience the day after the 2016 election, “This will not be the first time your country will break your heart.” Hearing that from the crowd, my heart pulled. And my heart sighed. And my heart grieved. But we picked ourselves up. That election energized my generation. It made us eager to campaign harder next time, and it made those of us who didn’t campaign regret it. In the 2018 midterm elections, voter turnout of people ages 18-29 increased by 10 percent since the 2014 midterms. This has much to do with the rise in young campaign volunteers knocking on doors and ringing telephone lines, many...

Sophomores Find Mostly Positive Support System in SOAR

Christo Hays

February 8, 2019

One of the first things students attending the Sophomore Opportunities and Academic Resources retreat were asked to do was close their eyes and imagine their future. When you wake up in the morning a decade from now, what does the room look like? What is your morning routine? Where is your workplace? What kind of work do you do? By the end of the retreat — “retreat” meaning two days cooped up in the Carnegie and King Buildings — I didn’t have answers to those questions. But I did have a folder full of detailed major pathways and some ideas for study away and Winter Term. SOAR is, on paper, a cohort-based support system somewhat like Peer Advising Leaders — but instead of learning about the best study spots...

A Wandering Jew Goes to Washington

Justin Pelofsky, Contributing Writer

February 8, 2019

It all began rather inconspicuously. In fact, at the height of the holiday season, the way it was announced seemed almost like a gift. It was as if the stubbornness of President Trump squeezed its way down the chimney, crept through the house, and placed the government shutdown gently at the base of the tree. Federal workers who work so hard throughout the year usually only get a handful of free vacation days. Quite honestly, they deserved a break. And sure, they suffered a slight sting at the reminder that they weren’t an “essential,” part of the Federal Government but it would have stung even more to have used up all their vacation days just to travel back to the town where they went to high school, engage...

The Tricks to Making Ramen Even More Delicious

Carson Li, Contributing Writer

December 7, 2018

We need to rethink the way we treat our ramen. I know it’s cheap — $1.75 per pack on Amazon and in stores — and oftentimes it comes with a plastic bowl. It’s also seemingly easy to make: You boil the water, drop in the noodle patty, then the flavor packet. I grew up eating ramen as one of my favorite foods, and I think it could taste much better if we put more consideration into how we cook it. I know it sounds ridiculous — you just pour water into a bowl, what’s the point of changing anything? How could there be a difference in taste? Well, even pouring water has science behind it, and can make a huge difference in taste. More importantly, ramen reflects the way Americans tend to treat their food:...

President Trump Doesn’t Cause Hate, Apathy Does

Ilana Foggle, Columnist

December 7, 2018

Editor’s note: This article contains mention of gun violence and anti-Semitism. It’s Hanukkah time (not to be equated to “Jewish Christmas,” by the way). For many Jews, this is a time full of celebration, sufganiyot, latkes, gifts, gelt, and joy. When I was growing up, Hanukkah was always about family, remembrance, and perseverance. All Jewish people may have different memories about how they celebrated Hanukkah. But, for many, this Hanukkah is different. On Oct. 27, 2018, a gunman entered the Tree of Life Congregation in Pittsburgh on Shabbat and shot and killed 11 Jews during their time of worship. When I woke up that morning and saw the news, I began to cry. I cried for my ancestors who survived persecut...

Joy Karega Deserved to be Fired

Tom Cohn, College Senior

November 30, 2018

The Review recently reported that Joy Karega is suing Oberlin over her dismissal, her case “claiming breach of contract and employment discrimination on the basis of race and gender” (“Karega Sues College, Claiming Discrimination,” The Oberlin Review, Nov. 16, 2018). She actually got fired for posting indisputably anti-Semitic conspiracy theories on Facebook. Does anyone think this constitutes discrimination against her? Firing Karega reflected basic morality and logic. We know in principle that any institution is justified in firing someone who, even in their personal life, publicly endorses vulgar, racist ideas. Many of Karega’s defenders likely concede as much. For example, when yet another white person h...

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