The Oberlin Review

Students Should Recognize Ohioans as Neighbors, Not Just Voters

Elmo Tumbokon, Contributing Writer

February 15, 2019

Dolores Huerta, a co-founder of the United Farm Workers and organizer of the Delano Grape Strikes, reminded a crying audience the day after the 2016 election, “This will not be the first time your country will break your heart.” Hearing that from the crowd, my heart pulled. And my heart sighed. And my heart grieved. But we picked ourselves up. That election energized my generation. It made us eager to campaign harder next time, and it made those of us who didn’t campaign regret it. In the 2018 midterm elections, voter turnout of people ages 18-29 increased by 10 percent since the 2014 midterms. This has much to do with the rise in young campaign volunteers knocking on doors and ringing telephone lines, many...

Sophomores Find Mostly Positive Support System in SOAR

Christo Hays

February 8, 2019

One of the first things students attending the Sophomore Opportunities and Academic Resources retreat were asked to do was close their eyes and imagine their future. When you wake up in the morning a decade from now, what does the room look like? What is your morning routine? Where is your workplace? What kind of work do you do? By the end of the retreat — “retreat” meaning two days cooped up in the Carnegie and King Buildings — I didn’t have answers to those questions. But I did have a folder full of detailed major pathways and some ideas for study away and Winter Term. SOAR is, on paper, a cohort-based support system somewhat like Peer Advising Leaders — but instead of learning about the best study spots...

A Wandering Jew Goes to Washington

Justin Pelofsky, Contributing Writer

February 8, 2019

It all began rather inconspicuously. In fact, at the height of the holiday season, the way it was announced seemed almost like a gift. It was as if the stubbornness of President Trump squeezed its way down the chimney, crept through the house, and placed the government shutdown gently at the base of the tree. Federal workers who work so hard throughout the year usually only get a handful of free vacation days. Quite honestly, they deserved a break. And sure, they suffered a slight sting at the reminder that they weren’t an “essential,” part of the Federal Government but it would have stung even more to have used up all their vacation days just to travel back to the town where they went to high school, engage...

The Tricks to Making Ramen Even More Delicious

Carson Li, Contributing Writer

December 7, 2018

We need to rethink the way we treat our ramen. I know it’s cheap — $1.75 per pack on Amazon and in stores — and oftentimes it comes with a plastic bowl. It’s also seemingly easy to make: You boil the water, drop in the noodle patty, then the flavor packet. I grew up eating ramen as one of my favorite foods, and I think it could taste much better if we put more consideration into how we cook it. I know it sounds ridiculous — you just pour water into a bowl, what’s the point of changing anything? How could there be a difference in taste? Well, even pouring water has science behind it, and can make a huge difference in taste. More importantly, ramen reflects the way Americans tend to treat their food:...

President Trump Doesn’t Cause Hate, Apathy Does

Ilana Foggle, Columnist

December 7, 2018

Editor’s note: This article contains mention of gun violence and anti-Semitism. It’s Hanukkah time (not to be equated to “Jewish Christmas,” by the way). For many Jews, this is a time full of celebration, sufganiyot, latkes, gifts, gelt, and joy. When I was growing up, Hanukkah was always about family, remembrance, and perseverance. All Jewish people may have different memories about how they celebrated Hanukkah. But, for many, this Hanukkah is different. On Oct. 27, 2018, a gunman entered the Tree of Life Congregation in Pittsburgh on Shabbat and shot and killed 11 Jews during their time of worship. When I woke up that morning and saw the news, I began to cry. I cried for my ancestors who survived persecut...

Joy Karega Deserved to be Fired

Tom Cohn, College Senior

November 30, 2018

The Review recently reported that Joy Karega is suing Oberlin over her dismissal, her case “claiming breach of contract and employment discrimination on the basis of race and gender” (“Karega Sues College, Claiming Discrimination,” The Oberlin Review, Nov. 16, 2018). She actually got fired for posting indisputably anti-Semitic conspiracy theories on Facebook. Does anyone think this constitutes discrimination against her? Firing Karega reflected basic morality and logic. We know in principle that any institution is justified in firing someone who, even in their personal life, publicly endorses vulgar, racist ideas. Many of Karega’s defenders likely concede as much. For example, when yet another white person h...

SFC Strives to Increase Efficiency Through Council System

Elijah Aladin, Contributing Writer

November 30, 2018

Over the course of this semester, SFC has been reviewing its policies to identify inefficiencies and improve the efficacy of its allocations. The following piece lays out the structure for a new council system that SFC is adopting. The original policy’s language has been edited by the Review for length and clarity. The Student Finance Committee is undergoing a policy review to restructure funding channels for the services and activities sponsored by the Student Activity Fund. In coordination with Student Senate and the Office of the Student Treasurer, SFC must evaluate the efficacy of core allocation processes. While this is an ongoing evaluation subject to feedback, the committee has identified major inefficienc...

Oberlin Churches Should Consider Pay-it-Forward Lighting Program

Lucia Mason and Elan Rochelle-Share

November 30, 2018

Lighting retrofits are becoming accessible to more Oberlin churches through a highly successful program that combines rebates provided by the city with the altruistic nature of churches. The Pay-it-Forward Program strengthens ties between Oberlin churches, reduces carbon dioxide emissions, and — with a little help from Review readers — has the potential to do the same in other communities as well. The program was born after the First Church in Oberlin, United Church of Christ, qualified for a rebate of approximately $1,800 by switching their lighting from incandescent bulbs to LEDs, according to Eugene Matthews, co-chair of First Church’s “green team” and member of their facilities committee. Instead of...

SOAR Program to Benefit Sophomores

Meg Parker, Contributing Writer

November 16, 2018

The brainchild of Associate Dean of Students and Interim Director of the Career Development Center Dana Hamdan, the Sophomore Opportunities and Advising Resources program is one of the most exciting things to come to fruition at Oberlin this year. When Dana called me into her office to discuss the then-unnamed initiative, I had the same thought as when I first learned about the Peer Advising Leaders Program: “I wish I had had this!” There are some challenging parts of my college experience I would never want to redo (Intro to Computer Programming and off-season lifting with former Strength and Conditioning Coach Grant Butler included), but if I had the opportunity to go back and enroll in SOAR, I would do so in...

Administration, Students Must Collaborate to Deal with Mental Health on Campus

Kristen Harris, Contributing Writer

November 16, 2018

A campus-wide email was sent out to students Oct. 30 by Associate Dean of Students Matthew Hayden, asking them to participate in the Healthy Minds Study. The survey was designed by the Healthy Minds Study Team of the University of Michigan to give students a chance to reflect on and express concerns with mental health stressors within the institution and campus environment. The survey also aims to heighten awareness of sources of support. In the survey, students are asked about their eating and sleeping habits, substance use and abuse, current and past emotional and mental health, and body image. Upon reflecting on this study and our current state of affairs as an institution, I have come to see it as a potential...

CDS Welcomes Feedback to Enact Dining Changes

Pearse Anderson, Contributing Writer

November 16, 2018

This semester has seen a whirlwind of dining changes at Oberlin, including the reopening of Sky Bar’s lunch (and now pilot breakfast) service, the expansion of hours at Stevenson Dining Hall, and the reorganizing and downsizing of Fourth Meal into its original Rathskeller location, to name a few. These changes are a lot for dining administrators to understand, much less Oberlin students already tackling a full workload and rich extracurriculars. To combat the confusion, two new systems of student-administration communication have been developed for the community to learn about dining changes, while also reporting back what isn’t working in practice. The first way is though the Dining Ambassador program, a group...

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