The Oberlin Review

Legislature Must Consider HB 6

Scott Medwid, Oberlin Resident

December 13, 2019

 I am writing in response to last week’s article “House Bill 6 Poses Serious Environmental, Health Risks” (The Oberlin Review, Dec. 6, 2019). I was involved in the multi-year campaign to keep the Lake Erie-based nuclear electric generators open and operating. The Ohio Public Utilities Commission reports that 15 percent of Ohio’s total electrical generation volume comes from these facilities. This electricity is provided to customers 24 hours a day, seven days a week, regardless of the weather. The electricity is generated by the fission of uranium in nuclear reactors — a process that is highly monitored, maintained, regulated, and inspected. The Ohio PUC reports that 11 million tons of carbon, 18,000 ton...

House Bill 6 Poses Serious Environmental, Health Risks

Klara Jacobs, Contributing Writer

December 6, 2019

 The debate over Ohio House Bill 6 — which outlines a seven-year program that will subsidize Ohio’s two major nuclear power plants — has implications far beyond what one may presume. Effective as of October, HB 6 suggests that this subsidy will produce a large-scale increase in environmental and economic payoff from the plants.  The two plants, Perry and Davis-Besse, are run by FirstEnergy Solutions, a bankrupt subsidiary of Ohio’s major energy production company. FirstEnergy threatened to shut down the plants in 2020 unless subsidies were provided for their continuation. Ohio lawmakers approved HB 6 in July, meaning that fees, capped at 85 cents per month, will be added to taxpayers’ electricity bills. ...

Local Petitions Challenge REC Choice Fund Options

Jenna Gyimesi

March 31, 2017

Local community members are pushing to overturn a recent initiative that would give city residents the option of donating revenue from renewable energy back to the city. A committee of city residents created two petitions that, if passed, would put the city’s Community Choice Fund back on next year’s ballot. The fund allows residents to donate their share of the city’s Renewable Energy Credits back to the City to invest in further sustainable energy projects. Last year, City Council decided that Oberlin would return 85 percent of the proceeds from the sale of RECs to city residents and give 15 percent of the proceeds to sustainability projects, which comes out to around $100 per year for each resident. Renewable...

Energy Credit Referendum Wrecked by Paperwork Havoc

Melissa Harris, Production Editor

September 2, 2016

Oberlin voters will not decide the distribution of $2.6 million in Renewable Energy Credits this fall because of a paperwork error in submitting a ballot initiative. The Lorain County Board of Elections rejected the proposed ballot initiative on Aug. 18 when Chairwoman of the Sustainable Reserve Committee Heather Adelman submitted the signatures to Oberlin officials but failed to include a copy of the text and title of the referendum. Renewable Energy Credits are certificates that prove a one megawatt-hour of electricity was produced with renewable energy. These certificates can be bought and sold on the open market. Since Oberlin draws most of its energy from renewable sources, the city has raised $2.6 million...

This chart shows the difference in Oberlin's emissions in metric tons of CO2 in 2015 and 2012.  .

City Meets Target, Halves Carbon Emissions

February 20, 2015

The city of Oberlin has met its target of cutting 2012 greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2015. Oberlin emitted 113,832 metric tons of greenhouse gases in 2012 and is projected to emit 56,866 metric tons in 2015, according to analysis done by the consulting firm Cameron-Cole. “In three years, we halved the entire city’s greenhouse gas emissions,” said Sean Hayes, the executive director of the Oberlin Project. The Oberlin Project is an organization that seeks to help Oberlin make progress...

Established 1874.