The Oberlin Review

TIMARA Program Produces Striking, Unusual Cinema

Daniel Hautzinger, Staff Writer

September 28, 2012

Filed under ARTS, Theater & Film, Visual Art

Although it has been around for quite some time, the mention of TIMARA often draws confused looks. Everyone knows of the existence of the program, whose acronym stands for Technology in Music and Related Arts, but not many seem to understand what it involves. The screening of films by TIMARA faculty and alumni last Saturday at the newly reopened Apollo Theatre provided a vivid and immersive sample of what exactly it is that TIMARA majors do. After a brief introduction by Professor of Computer Music and Digital Arts Tom Lopez, the chair of the TIMARA Department, roaring rushes of noise ushered the audience into a world of vast soundscapes and enigmatic, beautiful and kinetic images. These are films to absorb rather...

Demme’s Doubleheader Pt.1

Daniel Hautzinger, Staff Writer

September 28, 2012

Filed under ARTS, Theater & Film

The Apollo Theatre made its public debut on Friday with a screening of Jonathan Demme’s most recent film Enzo Avitabile Music Life, its first showing outside a film festival. Cinema Studies Program Director Geoff Pingree introduced Demme, who then prefaced his film by passionately stressing the importance of the Apollo’s new facilities for post-production and community outreach. He also briefly summarized the backstory behind Enzo Avitabile Music Life, a documentary about the Neapolitan musician Enzo Avitabile sponsored by the Italian television channel Radio Audizioni Italiane. Enzo is essentially a concert film intercut with Mr. Avitabile and his friends and family discussing his life and work. Its draw resides...

Alums in the Cinema World Illuminate Obies’ Futures

Sarp Yavuz, Arts Editor

September 28, 2012

Filed under ARTS, Theater & Film

While Oberlin certainly has a historical connection to the world of cinema, especially with regards to the Apollo Theatre, one does not think of Oberlin when considering career in the field. This past weekend’s Illuminate events saw four alumni — Micha Hillyard, OC ‘11, Jennifer Malkowski, OC ‘04, Ry Russo-Young, OC ‘03, and Stefan Grube, OC ‘03 — sharing their experiences and success stories dealing with cinema in various fields in a panel held in the newly renovated Apollo Theatre. Malkowski is a McPherson post-doctoral fellow in film and new media at Smith College. After Oberlin, she pursued a Ph.D in film and media from UC Berkeley. She was also a pre-school student portrait photographer for some...

Apollo Revisits Era of Silent Movies with Louis

Matthew Sprung

September 28, 2012

Filed under ARTS, Theater & Film

Anticipatory chatter buzzed around the revamped Apollo Theatre last Sunday night like the “wah-wah” sound of a plunger mute. An earlier, invite-only presentation of Louis, the 2010 homage to Louis Armstrong, on the night of Thursday the 20th had Oberlin demanding another chance to catch the unique experience. In an introduction to the audience, Dean of the Conservatory David Stull remarked that the interdisciplinary affair was “an example of what is possible at the Apollo” in its ability to provide “rare and unique performances.” The film was made to be accompanied by a live jazz score, and the director, Dan Pritzker, placed the task of arranging and composing music in the capable hands of Wynton Marsalis...

Faculty Films Reimagine the Amerikan Documentary

Abby Hawkins, Staff Writer

September 28, 2012

Filed under ARTS, Theater & Film

Don Matis, a Hudson, Ohio, artist and self-described “Catholic lay evangelist,” paints with his beard. In the short film of which he is the subject, part of the documentary series The Amerikans screened Sept. 22 at the Apollo, Don openly discusses his views on God, art and his path to happiness. While one couldn’t help but giggle initially at the sight of Don slapping his paint-loaded beard onto a canvas in his stylishly sparse studio, it quickly became clear that we could all do well to heed Don’s advice on the importance of kindness and authenticity in our interpersonal relationships. Such deeply resonant human connection to the screen, found in the most unexpected of characters, is the hallmark of The...

Apollo Returns to Educate, Entertain

Daniel Hautzinger and Julian Ring

September 21, 2012

Filed under ARTS, Theater & Film

The Apollo Theatre has been hopping all summer, but the crew working on its massive renovation has kicked it into overdrive in the past few weeks in preparation for this weekend’s grand re-opening. Construction crews were dodging ladders and carts full of wood composite, while upstairs technicians were hurriedly attending to stacks of humming servers. Opening night was only two days away, and there was a lot of work to be done before the theater would be up and running. Nevertheless, Oberlin College Media Relations Director Scott Wargo just beamed at the work going on. “I don’t usually use the word ‘unique’ to describe something,” Wargo said. “I don’t think people use it correctly in speech a lot of...

The Quick and Delicious Film Screening of American Reverie

Stephanie Tallering, Staff Writer

May 4, 2012

Filed under ARTS, Theater & Film

Members of Exhibition Practices in the Media Arts, Cinema Studies Professor Brett Kashmere’s CINE 323 course, presented their final project this Wednesday. Screened at Oberlin’s Quick and Delicious, a local diner, American Reverie was curated by College Juniors Emily Schkolnick and Hannah Jones and College sophomore Jenny Miller, and included films by Animal Charm, Kenneth Anger, Sam Green, Deborah Stratman, David Lynch and Stephanie Barber. Quick and Delicious provided an appropriate setting for a screening intended to reevaluate and problematize classic Americana tropes. The program investigated how surveillance, inequality and anomie have become endemic undercurrents of a society that places such a high p...

College Senior Will Roane Debuts Film Old Photograph

College Senior Will Roane Debuts Film Old Photograph

May 4, 2012

Can you tell us a little bit about the film’s content? The film centers around an unnamed narrator, who imagines the history of her grandparents in the mid-century American South, based upon a photograph she has of them together. She visits various places that she believes they once were while wondering what might have happened there. Some parts seem more like clear memories, while others are more purely imagined. You could definitely call the film gothic, as certain aspects of the narrator...

Iphigenia at Aulis [Mee remix]: An Oberlin-Cleveland Collaboration

Will Passannante, Staff Writer

April 20, 2012

Filed under ARTS, Theater & Film

Fact: Euripides wrote Iphigenia at Aulis over 2000 years ago. Fact: The production of Iphigenia 2.0 currently featured at the Cleveland Public Theater (CPT) from April 12-28 includes soldiers clad in mere underwear dancing to hip-hop, references to “Palestinians … with RPGs” and an absolute absence of togas. Which is not to call it a politically motivated strip show. The production is far too beautifully nuanced to necessitate a stack of singles. Iphigenia 2.0 is the first major production to come out of a new relationship between CPT and Oberlin College. This time around, CPT gave 13 student actors and two student stage managers the opportunity to work on and around a professional stage with working actors....

Girls Just Want to Have Fun, but Unemployment Makes it Difficult

Sarp Yavuz, Staff Writer

April 20, 2012

Filed under ARTS, Theater & Film

It is impossible not to compare HBO’s new series Girls, created by Lena Dunham, OC ’08, to Sex and the City. Any show that portrays the lives of young women struggling with relationships and life in the big city bears that burden. What sets Girls apart from previous attempts at carrying on the Carrie Bradshaw legacy — Lipstick Jungle, Cashmere Mafia — is something perhaps no one was expecting: awkwardness. Obies might be familiar with the hilariously uncomfortable moments Dunham has written into the first two episodes, screened by HBO to a packed West Lecture Hall this past Thursday. Feeling, witnessing or experiencing awkwardness is, along with agitation or fascination with albino squirrels, a kind...

Projection Performance Introduces New form of Artistic Media

Michelle Polyak, Staff Writer

April 6, 2012

Filed under ARTS, Theater & Film

Jonathan Walley, professor of Cinema Studies and video production at Denison University, came to Oberlin this Tuesday to deliver a lecture titled “Meaning, Materiality, and Mystery: Projection Performance,” as part of Oberlin’s Film Is...Not Film: Expanded Cinema Now and Then series organized by Oberlin professor of Cinema Studies, Brett Kashmere. Walley’s lecture focused on projection performance, a new form of artistic media emerging in the contemporary conceptual art scene. Walley began with an explanation of what projection performance is and then examined how it functions within the realm of cinema. Focusing on physical film and film projectors, projection performance is a live, ephemeral experience that exp...

Film Series Experiments with Conventions of Cinema

Julia Hubay, Staff Writer

April 6, 2012

Filed under ARTS, Theater & Film

This past week, the Cinema Studies department celebrated an experimental film genre known as expanded cinema, with a series of events presenting its seminal works and discussing the movement. Among the pieces of expanded cinema on view were two 16mm films: “Four Square” (1971) by Beverly and Tony Conrad, and “Line Describing a Cone” (1973) by Anthony McCall. Brett Kashmere, visiting assistant professor of Cinema Studies, and Jonathan Walley, associate professor of cinema at Denison University, staged the screening and introduced the works. Commenting on the audience packed tightly into the shooting studio on the top floor of Mudd Library, Walley said only half-jokingly that this might have been the largest...

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