The Oberlin Review

Shopping Center Plans Raise Concern at City Council Hearing

Shopping Center Plans Raise Concern at City Council Hearing

November 1, 2019

Plans are in motion to develop a 28-acre shopping center at the intersection of Ohio State Route 58 and U.S. Route 20 in Oberlin. The proposition was met with resistance from community members at a City Council hearing on Oct. 21. The property belongs to Oberlin Fire Chief Robert Hanmer, who intends to sell it to Carnegie Management and Development Corporation if the plans are approved. Carnegie Management expects to spend $10–15 million on construction, and predicts that the development could brin...

Vote Slocum for City Council

Bryan Burgess, President, Oberlin City Council

November 1, 2019

 I encourage voters in Oberlin to vote for Linda Slocum for Oberlin City Council this November. Linda’s tenure on the Council, like many others who have held the position, could be scored based on her accomplishments, her advocacy, and her work ethic. Yet, she would be the first to downplay any of those distinctions. Linda is a uniter and a team builder. Her core strength is seeking consensus among her colleagues. City Council brings together seven unique individuals to make group decisions, and Linda’s key role has been to facilitate compromise. Linda’s voice on the Council is one of experience and wisdom. Join me in voting for Linda Slocum on Nov. 5.

Despite Zoning Challenges, Lorain Street Food Truck Opens

Despite Zoning Challenges, Lorain Street Food Truck Opens

October 4, 2019

After over a year of searching, Steel Magnolia — the only food truck currently located in Oberlin — has found a home on 408 E. Lorain St., near IGA. The truck serves a mix of soul food and traditional Caribbean cuisine and was opened by Oberlin native Shontae Jackson who runs it with her mom, Sarah Jackson, and 17-year-old daughter, Tanzania. Sarah says that seeing her daughter succeed has been incredibly fulfilling. “Ever since she was a little girl, it’s been her dream,” Sarah said...

City Council Prepares to Release Next Greenhouse Gas Inventory

City Council Prepares to Release Next Greenhouse Gas Inventory

September 27, 2019

The City of Oberlin’s Office of Sustainability has completed a 2019 iteration of a greenhouse gas inventory, which will be released on the city’s web page in the coming weeks. The inventory is the latest of four, dating back to 2007, and was performed in order to prioritize how to spend the city’s Sustainable Reserve Fund. “[The greenhouse gas inventory] is what we’re going to look at as a guide when we start looking at what initiatives are really going to be the most important and in...

Court of Appeals Sides With Oberlin in NEXUS Dispute

Ella Moxley, Senior Staff Writer

September 20, 2019

In a legal blow to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the U.S. Court of Appeals sided with the City of Oberlin and other plaintiffs who opposed the NEXUS pipeline’s proposed use of eminent domain in the construction of the natural gas pipeline. Oberlin took NEXUS to court because the 256-mile natural gas pipeline, which stretches from Kensington, OH to Canada, runs through land within city limits. The city argued that under the Natural Gas Act, FERC could only grant authorization for the use of eminent domain to companies like NEXUS for interstate projects, not international ones. The legal concept of eminent domain concerns reclaiming of private land for public need without compensation. In addition, Ober...

Windstorm Whips Through Northeast Ohio

Windstorm Whips Through Northeast Ohio

March 1, 2019

It was a blustery weekend across the Midwest and Northeast, as winds reaching 65 miles per hour uprooted trees, damaged buildings and vehicles, and triggered power outages. Just down the road in Cleveland, a brick wall fell on a parking lot full of cars and left destruction in its wake, according to Cleveland 19 News. David Orr Associate Professor of Environmental Studies and Associate Professor of Biology Roger Laushman said that the storm was caused by the interaction of two different pressure...

Sidewalks, Social Justice Discussed in State of the City Address

Tess Joosse, Staff Writer

March 30, 2018

City Council President Bryan Burgess and City Manager Rob Hillard addressed past successes, such as improvements in city services, public works, social justice, and energy sustainability, as well as challenges and future projects in Oberlin’s State of the City address last Thursday. Burgess also gave the attendees an update on construction of the NEXUS pipeline, which he said will inevitably be built, despite local activists’ best efforts. For several years, the city has engaged in litigation aimed at rerouting the NEXUS pipeline, which in recent months has become the subject of several protests in the community. However, since a federal judge ruled in favor of NEXUS in December, Burgess said construction is ex...

City Should Continue Fight Against NEXUS Pipeline

Nathan Carpenter, Columnist

February 16, 2018

When I first arrived at Oberlin in fall 2016, I learned that the impending construction of the NEXUS pipeline was a key community issue that much of the city firmly opposed. I also learned that Oberlin had a silver bullet that would stop the pipeline from being constructed within city limits: its Community Bill of Rights and Obligations. The CBRO unequivocally states that, following its codification, new gas and oil pipelines cannot be built within the city of Oberlin — without exception. It is a powerful document expressing our community’s commitment to self-determination and affirming Oberlin’s ongoing leadership in combating climate change. For some time, the outlook for the anti-NEXUS camp was hopeful — p...

Court Rules Against Construction in Ohio City, Gives Oberlin Hope

Eliza Guinn, Production Editor

December 1, 2017

Construction on the NEXUS pipeline halted in the Northeast Ohio city of Green after the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals voted in a 2–1 decision to block the company from building within city limits. Members of Oberlin City Council and Students for Energy Justice, an organization at the College, are continuing work to raise awareness and protesting with hopes of achieving the same result. Green spent $350,000 of the city’s annual budget of $32 million fighting the pipeline’s construction. Green Mayor Gerard Neugebauer claims he opposed the plan since he was hired more than two years ago, and this court ruling provides a reprieve — likely of several months — before any further arguments or court actions ensu...

City Council Rejects NEXUS Offer For Easement

City Council Rejects NEXUS Offer For Easement

November 3, 2017

City Council held an emergency meeting Saturday, deciding to reject a $3,500 offer from NEXUS for means of access. The offer would have given NEXUS the legal right to use city property without owning it, granting the company the ability to begin building its pipeline. The Oberlin Community Bill of Rights, which was created in 2013, prohibits the creation of infrastructure relating to fracking in the city. City Councilmember Bryan Burgess added that the city also does not have authorization to...

2017 Candidates and Issues: Heather Adelman, Bryan Burgess, Sharon Pearson, and Linda Slocum

Charles Peterson, Associate Professor of Africana Studies

October 27, 2017

To the Editors: I am writing this letter in support of the candidacies of Heather Adelman, Sharon Pearson, Linda Slocum, and Bryan Burgess for Oberlin City Council. I fortunately have some experience in Oberlin politics, and can honestly say it is at its most effective and most true to the character of the community when it surges forward. Adelman, Pearson, Slocum, and Burgess have shown an investment in new ideas, policies, and directions that open up the lungs of Oberlin, allowing the city to breathe in new opportunities. Every element of their broad, varied, and deep experiences feeds their service and commitment to the rich possibilities of our community. Whether in the areas of sustainable environmental policy, progr...

Student Input Necessary to Avoid Finger Pointing

Editorial Board

April 28, 2017

Following last week’s tuition hikes, the sentiment bears repeating: The administration needs to include students in conversations about major institutional decisions, financial or otherwise. The scenario played out much like similar situations often have in the past. Behind closed doors, administrators privately pivoted in favor of a 2.8-percent tuition hike and higher flat-rate housing and dining costs under the guise of “improving equity.” Students protested, organized events and held meetings about where to go from here as constituents in an institution without adequate representation. Administrators sent emails. And more emails. The justifications for these hikes have largely fallen flat on a student...

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