The Oberlin Review

Court of Appeals Sides With Oberlin in NEXUS Dispute

Ella Moxley, Senior Staff Writer

September 20, 2019

In a legal blow to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the U.S. Court of Appeals sided with the City of Oberlin and other plaintiffs who opposed the NEXUS pipeline’s proposed use of eminent domain in the construction of the natural gas pipeline. Oberlin took NEXUS to court because the 256-mile natural gas pipeline, which stretches from Kensington, OH to Canada, runs through land within city limits. The city argued that under the Natural Gas Act, FERC could only grant authorization for the use of eminent domain to companies like NEXUS for interstate projects, not international ones. The legal concept of eminent domain concerns reclaiming of private land for public need without compensation. In addition, Ober...

Thank You For Passing Issue 11

David Hall, Superintendent, Oberlin City Schools

November 30, 2018

Oberlin City Schools would like to thank all of our parents, staff, students, and community members for supporting Issue 11. It has been a long journey. The district has been engaged in exploring and researching new school facilities for over 10 years. The vision for the district is to design and create a new state-of-the-art facility for our students and community. This will provide the district with future cost savings, security enhancements, and advanced technology. With the passing of Issue 11, the vision has become a reality. I would like to thank our Bond Committee, Facilities Committee, previous superintendents (John Schroth and Geoff Andrews), the School Board, and community members for all of the hard work...

Whose Land Are We On?

Editorial Board

October 12, 2018

The City of Oberlin celebrated Indigenous Peoples’ Day for the second time ever this Monday, after officially changing the holiday’s name from Columbus Day in 2017. Oberlin joins a growing number of cities around the country in rejecting dominant narratives of colonial expansion, instead choosing to recognize and remember the violence that Columbus and other settlers inflicted — and continue to inflict — on Indigenous peoples across North and South America. We stand behind the City of Oberlin in changing the holiday’s name. We also view the change as an opportunity to further consider the histories of Indigenous communities who lived here before us. A land acknowledgement is a conscious, historically-grounded...

Issue 11 Benefits All

Mary B. McKee, Oberlin Resident

October 12, 2018

After years of study and debate, the local school board, to its credit, has finally put the bond issue on the ballot to start building a single-campus school designed to meet the needs of our small but special district. Despite careful stewardship over the last 50 years, we cannot further extend the health and life of the four school buildings we currently struggle to heat, cool, and maintain — all built at a time when there were about twice as many students, all sitting (often sweating) in rows upon rows of desks trying to hear the teacher, see the chalkboard, and follow along in the textbook. Times change, and we must adapt. New teaching methods, pathways to learning, modern approaches to architecture, engineering,...

Students Should Vote in Local Elections

Ezra Andres-Tysch, College Junior

October 12, 2018

I was deeply disturbed by “Oberlin Students Must Evaluate Their Place in Local Elections” by Opinions Editor Jackie Brant (The Oberlin Review, Oct. 5, 2018). She makes the case that students should not vote in Ohio for the midterm elections because — as part-time Ohioans — we cannot possibly understand the stakes or feel the repercussions of our vote. Brant illustrates her point in great detail using Issue 11, a complex education funding proposal that Oberlin residents and students can vote on this November, as a frame. Brant says Issue 11 is an example of how Oberlin students may overstep in the election, voting on a proposal that will not affect them but could be quite impactful to the full-time resident...

Group Forms to Oppose Issue 11

Debbi Walsh, Members, Oberlin Concerned Citizens

October 12, 2018

We represent a growing group of residents who believe that the proposed new Oberlin City Schools building (Issue 11) is not in the best interest of the community. We have established a group called Oberlin Concerned Citizens to collectively express our views. If you are curious about our concerns and interested in alternative options to a new building, please visit oberlinconcernedcitizens.org. Melissa Ballard Lorrie Chmura Debbi Walsh Joan Webster Members, Oberlin Concerned Citizens

New School Facility Would Serve All Oberlin Residents

Linda Slocum, Vice President, Oberlin City Council

October 5, 2018

Starting fresh with new facilities in our public school system offers our community the opportunity to envision something bigger than solely accommodating the needs of our school-age population. Let’s look at the campus as a way to serve all residents! How can we best utilize our structures for more hours of the day for things like music and drama, adult education and exercise, social support services, preschool care, computer literacy, library services, and city recreation programs? If we maximize the potential uses of our facilities, we can also share expenses, lessening the burden on school district taxpayers alone. A comprehensive plan requires creative thinking, cooperation among many stakeholders, and clear...

Oberlin Students Must Evaluate Their Place in Local Elections

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

October 5, 2018

As critical midterm elections approach, Oberlin students need to again consider where and how we will vote. Many of us are transient residents both in Oberlin and Ohio more generally; thus, we need to think about what our role in these communities should be. Consider Issue 11, which will be on Oberlin’s ballot this November. It’s the first phase of a levy that would consolidate Oberlin City Schools into a single building by 2025, increasing the tax burden of many Oberlin homeowners. Because of its impact on local taxes, Issue 11 is highly controversial. Many Oberlin residents feel that their taxes are already too high, and that has driven people out of town in the past. A significant percentage of the city’s...

Community Should Support Issue 11

John and Linda Gates, Oberlin Residents

October 5, 2018

Our schools reflect what we value. In the upcoming election, Oberlin residents will have the opportunity to vote on Issue 11, the bond issue that will result in the construction of “a state-of-the-art, cost-efficient, centralized educational campus that will be a key investment in the future of Oberlin designed for 21st-century learning practices, safety and security, sustainability, and community use.” This description is taken directly from the oberlinyes.org website that details the goal, the rationale, the cost savings per year for maintenance and upkeep of the current buildings, the amount of income the bond issue will generate, the timetable, how the project will be financed, and the projected cost per household....

Issue 11 Will Not Solve District’s Problems

Sandra Redd, Oberlin Resident

October 5, 2018

I attended Oberlin City Schools and so did my children. I do not remember a time that the community said “no” to higher school taxes. We had approximately 250 students that parents chose to send to non-OCS schools last year. One reason was bullying, and it is my understanding that we have a teacher who remains in the school system that many parents have said bullied their child. Do you really think we will draw people into the district because of a new building? No, families look at outcomes — are students ready for college and are they receiving a quality education? If your report card is an “F” now, it will not change just because of a new building. I was a part of the committee that proposed alternatives...

Students Should Attend Eliza Griswold’s Fossil Fuel Presentation

John Elder, OC ’53, Member of the First Church Green Team

September 21, 2018

Combining a poet’s artistry, a translator’s empathy, and an investigative journalist’s persistence, Eliza Griswold makes the deeply divisive issue of fossil fuel extraction grippingly real. We are very fortunate that the recipient of many prestigious awards is including Oberlin on her tour to talk about her rave-reviewed new book Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America. National Book Award winner George Packer calls it “a morally complex and beautifully written story … about what binds and tears apart a community and a country.” The Green Team of The First Church in Oberlin United Church of Christ invites you to attend her presentation this Sunday at 4 p.m. in the First Church Meeti...

Exhibit Highlights Japanese Internment Injustice

Exhibit Highlights Japanese Internment Injustice

February 23, 2018

“Courage and Compassion,” a historical exhibit that details national and local histories of Japanese Americans during World War II, opened at the Richard D. Baron ’64 Art Gallery last Saturday. Related lectures, film screenings, and concerts will run throughout the month, recounting the work of the local activists concerning Japanese-American incarceration during WWII. The Go For Broke National Education Center — a Los Angeles-based nonprofit founded by Japanese-American veterans in the 1980s — is sp...

Established 1874.