The Oberlin Review

NFL: No Fun League

Nate Levinson, Sports Editor

December 5, 2014

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

I’ve used this column before to express my displeasure with the NFL’s handling of numerous on- and off-field incidents, but as long as it continues to mishandle seemingly every adverse situation thrown its way, I’ll continue to write about the so-called No Fun League. Much of the inspiration for this week’s editorial is owed to controversial Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman and his teammate, wide receiver Doug Baldwin. Last week, the two reigning Super Bowl champs and Stanford alumni ripped the NFL’s decision to fine Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch $100,000 for refusing to speak to the media after a Nov. 16 loss to the Kansas City Chiefs. “You know, the other day Marshawn Lynch got fined $100...

Keep Calm, It’s LeBron

Nate Levinson, Sports Editor

November 14, 2014

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

The Cleveland Cavaliers team, expected by nearly every expert to be one of the best teams in the NBA, has gotten off to a slow start this season, dropping three of its first six games. It’s far from time to worry, though. The panic surrounding the team began following its opening game, when the Cavs fell to a weak Knicks team in what was supposed to be LeBron James’s glorious return to Cleveland. Instead, he turned the ball over eight times and scored just 17 points; the team lost by five. The team’s struggles have continued in subsequent games — the Cavaliers have fallen to both the Portland Trail Blazers and a Utah Jazz team that won just 25 games last season, the worst mark in the Western Conference. Le...

Disparities in Ebola Response Reveal Broader Health Care System Flaws

Editorial Board

October 31, 2014

Filed under Editorials, OPINIONS

At first glance, the swift diagnosis and isolation of Craig Spencer in New York City last week seemed to demonstrate improvement in the United States’ response to Ebola, the disease which has now killed nearly 5,000 people worldwide. Yet much remains unanswered in wake of Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan’s death and the infection of two health care workers in Dallas earlier this month. The slip-ups that likely contributed to these events suggest that containment of the virus itself, while critical, is only the tip of the iceberg. Nearly everything about Ebola is terrifying — nearly. From the illness’s gruesome effects on the body, to the lack of testing laboratories in Liberia, to the pessimistic projectio...

SFC Cuts Hurt Quality, Accessibility of Publications

Editorial Board

October 3, 2014

Filed under Editorials, OPINIONS

At Oberlin, journalism falls largely outside the scope of any department and thus into the hands of student publications. We strive to report on issues that matter, helping students remain informed and empowering them to serve as voices for change within their community. But a recent financial decision endangers all that. This week, the Review Editorial Board is partnering with the editors of Wilder Voice to call attention to recent policy changes by the Student Finance Committee that threaten student journalism at Oberlin. The Committee’s recent budget cuts not only limit our organizations’ accessibility, but also are the result of the SFC’s willfully ignorant and biased decision-making process. In what we feel ...

Journalists Must Remove Racial Slurs from Lexicon

Editorial Board

September 26, 2014

Filed under Editorials, OPINIONS

A student newspaper at a high school in Pennsylvania this week found itself at the epicenter of an issue that has for decades posed challenges for journalistic outlets nationwide: what to do about the fact that a popular and profitable athletic mascot is widely regarded as a racial slur. Sports teams at Neshaminy High School in Langhorne, PA, share the controversial mascot that serves as the official name of the NFL team from Washington, D.C. For over a year, the Neshaminy Playwickian has attempted to distance itself from the epithet by refusing to print it, despite forceful opposition from the school’s administration. Last week, these tensions came to a head as school officials suspended the publication’s studen...

Allyship Training Overdue

Tyler Sloan, Sports Editor

September 12, 2014

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

In what has been an important step in the right direction for Oberlin College Athletics this fall, the department required all fall varsity athletes to attend a two-hour trans allyship workshop for the first time during preseason in late August. Student facilitators from the Multicultural Resource Center conducted the workshops, which included lessons about distinguishing sex from gender and equipped student-athletes with other valuable tools regarding allyship, such as sharing different types of gender pronouns. One of the most intriguing parts of these workshops was the relatively even spread of questions coming from seniors to first-years. Though they came from various classes, student-athletes inquired with an earnest desire...

College Rankings Devalue Breadth of Knowledge, Ignore Human Element

Editorial Board

September 12, 2014

Filed under Editorials, OPINIONS

The days are getting shorter and crisper, and right on schedule, a host of disillusioned columnists are beginning to attack this year’s quantification of the unquantifiable. On Tuesday, US News & World Report released the 2015 edition of its widely acclaimed annual rankings of the nation’s best colleges; after a three-place uptick from last year, Oberlin College now rests at number 23 of all “National Liberal Arts Colleges.” Like its competitors, the list takes a number of factors into account, many of them quantitative rather than qualitative, and year after year, these reports generate inevitable controversy. The Review published an editorial last September, “Education More Than Return on Investment”...

Staff Seeks Balance Between Free Speech and Community Standards in Online Comment Moderation

The Editorial Board

April 13, 2014

Filed under Editorials, OPINIONS

Last week, an op-ed in the Los Angeles Times argued that Oberlin is turning into “[a symbol] of the widespread scourge of campus political correctness and the glorification of victimhood,” due to the administration’s recent discussion regarding the use of trigger warnings in the classroom. Beside the fact that the article mischaracterizes the actual trigger warning conversation occurring on campus — for instance, professors are not removing Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart from relevant curricula because of its controversial themes — the idea that trigger warnings are inherently “distressing ... potential incursions on academic freedom and inquiry” is flawed. Trigger warnings exist in order to warn...

Durant Challenges the King

Nate Levinson, Sports Editor

April 4, 2014

Filed under Recent Stories, SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

For the majority of the last decade, LeBron James has unquestionably been the best player in the NBA (apologies to Kobe Bryant). His all-around play and ability to make his teammates better were unrivaled, but this season LeBron’s seat atop the basketball hierarchy has been called into question. Well on his way to what should be the first of many MVP awards, Kevin Durant has placed himself firmly in the conversation for best player on the planet. The Oklahoma City Thunder’s 25-year-old superstar is averaging career highs of 32.2 points and 5.6 assists per game and has taken his game to a new level this season. He has now scored over 25 points in each of 39 consecutive games, the longest such streak since Michael...

Abusive Coaches Cross Line

Sarah Orbuch, Sports Editor

March 14, 2014

Filed under Recent Stories, SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

We’ve all had that coach: the one who makes you do extra laps after practice, unnecessarily blows the whistle and makes you wake up at the crack of dawn to foster “mental toughness.” It’s the coaches’ jobs to be tough on their players, make them work harder and push them past their limits. Given the job description, it can be difficult to determine how much pressure is too much. Every player takes criticism differently. For some, being told that they are underperforming can be motivation to work harder, while for others it can be emotionally damaging. Athletes are always told to toughen up, work under pressure and constantly improve. But there is a fine line between constructive criticism and emotional abuse....

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