The Oberlin Review

SFC Pivots to Ad-Hoc Fund After Board Rejects Fee Increase

Roman Broszkowski, News Editor

April 20, 2018

Filed under Campus News, NEWS, Recent Stories

The Board of Trustees rejected the Student Senate’s proposal to increase the student activity fee by $63 per semester next fiscal year. The decision — made at a March 22 board meeting — also called for the Student Finance Committee to repropose the fee raise when the board begins discussions for FY 2020 funding allocations. Senate initially presented the fee increase to the board March 9. The Office of the Student Treasurer initially drafted the proposal so that the SFC could keep up with student organizations’ budget demands and to bolster the diminishing funding pool. Student Senate Chair and College junior Kameron Dunbar presented the proposal to the board, and he added that he was disappointed in the boar...

DeCafé Anti-Theft Rules Mirror Stop-and-Frisk Policies

Kameron Dunbar, Columnist

April 20, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

In 2013, former United States District Court Judge for the Southern District of New York Shira Scheindlin ruled that New York City’s stop-and-frisk practice was unconstitutional. Specifically, she ruled that it violated the equal protection clause under the Fourteenth Amendment. What exactly was New York City’s stop-and-frisk? It was a New York Police Department policy that allowed officers to detain, question, and search pedestrians under the auspices of “reasonable suspicion” that the pedestrian was involved or implicated in a crime. Did it reduce crime? Unlikely. There’s little evidence suggesting that stop-and-frisk policing tactics affect crime rates. While New York City has gotten safer since 2002, ...

Martin Luther King’s Dream Continues to Be Misrepresented

Kameron Dunbar, Columnist

April 6, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a man on a noble quest for justice, righteousness, and peace. Many pundits, politicians, and public intellectuals alike find themselves living in his radiant light and quoting some of his awe-inspiring prose — and deservingly so. While King deserves every button, refrigerator magnet, greeting card, and Twitter banner made in his honor, he also deserves a fair and honest portrayal of his radical activism. As the nation pauses on the 50th anniversary of his assassination, it is imperative that we all think of King’s legacy and interrogate how it is represented to the public. Earlier this year, The New York Times columnist David Brooks invoked King’s famous “dream” in a call to move A...

OTC: Kirsten Pai Buick, Art History Professor

OTC: Kirsten Pai Buick, Art History Professor

March 9, 2018

Kirsten Pai Buick has been a professor of Art History at the University of New Mexico since 2001. She focuses on African-American art, western art, and representations of the human body. She has been researching Mary Edmonia Lewis, a sculptor who attended Oberlin College from 1859 to 1863, since 1991 and gave a talk last Thursday about the final years of Lewis’ life. At her talk, Buick discussed some of Oberlin’s historical figures such as Marianne Dascomb, John Mercer Langston, and the Keep fam...

Community Should Reflect Upon History of College Spaces

Kameron Dunbar, Columnist

March 9, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

Editor’s Note: This article contains mentions of sexual assault. I walk into North Hall every day. Most days, I forget that the official building name is “Langston Hall,” in honor of John Mercer Langston. That name may not be familiar to many, but this one may be: James Mercer Langston Hughes. Yes, that Langston Hughes. Langston Hughes was the grandson of Charles Henry Langston. Charles Henry Langston and his brother Gideon were the first two Black students admitted to Oberlin College. Charles and Gideon were John’s older brothers. John Mercer Langston was Langston Hughes’ great uncle. While John Mercer Langston’s name may not carry much global recognition, his life is a vital piece of Oberlin College’s ...

Trustees Return to Oberlin to Better Understand Student Life

Sydney Allen, News Editor

March 9, 2018

Filed under Campus News, NEWS, Recent Stories

This week, Oberlin administrators, faculty, trustees, and student senators convened for the Board of Trustees’ first 2018 meeting. The trustees participated in several events, including President Carmen Ambar’s proposed financial review and the first ever student organizations expo, as well as the traditional student-trustee forum and board-sponsored 5K run. After a successful December trustee meeting, where board members learned about campus via student-led tours — tours that largely led to Wilder Hall’s renovation — Senate hopes to further its creative approaches in engaging students and board members in dialogue. “We identified that trustees were concerned about a lack of student interfacing,” College s...

Students Must Protect Entirety of Oberlin, Not Just Specific Parts

Kameron Dunbar, Columnist

March 2, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

This article is part of the Review’s Student Senate column. In an effort to increase communication and transparency, Student Senators will provide personal perspectives on recent events on campus and in the community. President Carmen Ambar delivered her 10th comprehensive presentation on Oberlin’s financial futures on Wednesday, particularly the challenges and opportunities therein. King 306 was packed with students, with audible laughs and sighs throughout the event’s duration. Personally, I was extremely excited to see such an awesome turnout. Years of frustration, coupled with an inclination to interrogate institutions, have left the student body suspicious of practically anything that involves administra...

Ambar Details Finances, Solutions to Students

Ambar Details Finances, Solutions to Students

March 2, 2018

President Carmen Ambar presented to students about Oberlin’s current budgetary state and answered subsequent questions Wednesday evening in King Building. Ambar mentioned how she intends to answer the financial deficit in student-specific ways, including the eventual closing of Dascomb Hall’s cafeteria and older Village Housing Units. The presentation is the 10th in a series of 11 that Ambar has been giving to different groups on campus. The president said that financial decisions made over t...

“Black Panther” Shakes Foundations of Race, Gender Norms

Kameron Dunbar

February 23, 2018

Filed under ARTS, Recent Stories, Theater & Film

The world was watching Wakanda last weekend as Black Panther opened in theaters across North America, as it should have been — Black Panther is a landmark film for America, and in many ways a pivotal expression of Blackness in film. Some have posited Black Panther as a referendum on the financial and cultural salience of centering Blackness rather than relegating it to supporting roles. Appropriately released in the heat of Black History Month, the movie collected $241.9 million dollars in North American box office sales over the four-day President’s Day weekend. The movie’s success continues as it quickly approaches the $500 million mark globally. Wakanda, where the film is set, is a fictional African nati...

Paying Columnists Will Increase Accessibility

Nathan Carpenter, Columnist

February 23, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

In recent weeks, my fellow Review columnist Kameron Dunbar has published two pieces that succinctly and cogently identified instances in which Oberlin campus publications — namely, the Review and The Grape — have failed to assemble editorial staffs that reflect our community’s diversity and, as a result, have published pieces that fall short of the standards of rigorous inquiry and commitment to social justice that our community holds itself to. As a former Review opinions editor who is studying abroad this semester, I certainly understand the intensity of working for a campus publication. It can be a relatively thankless, if personally fulfilling job — the hours are long and come in addition to normal acade...

“Mexicocoa” Shows Need for Journalistic Diversity

Kameron Dunbar, Columnist

February 16, 2018

Filed under Columns, OPINIONS

My mom taught me never to say “I told you so.” But, if there was ever a time to say it, that time would be now. Just two weeks after I called for greater diversity in campus journalism, The Grape, Oberlin’s edgiest news magazine, published a piece titled “Spicy Mexicocoa.” In short, the article was a disaster. It centered around a recipe for a “spicy” mixed drink composed of only hot cocoa, milk, a shot of tequila, and a half shot of honey or maple syrup. Though the ingredients list was brief, there’s nothing on the list that would make the beverage “spicy” to anyone with a palate that can handle even the weakest chai tea brew. Beyond the absence of spice, the beverage referenced was a “Mexic...

Wilder Hall Renovation Begins, Citing Student Surveys

Wilder Hall Renovation Begins, Citing Student Surveys

February 9, 2018

Students returning to campus this week have been greeted with a revamped Wilder Hall lobby, which will undergo further changes as renovations continue. The lobby was enlarged and, according to a letter sent out by President Carmen Ambar and Student Senator and College junior Kameron Dunbar, “This area will be fitted with a new TV, speakers, and other entertainment options that will allow open music and entertainment streaming.” Additionally, a competition will be held to select some new icon...

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