The Oberlin Review

NIMBY Activism Will Not Halt NEXUS Pipeline Project

Adriana Teitelbaum, Contributing Writer

December 9, 2016

While many activists and public officials have been focusing their outrage on the Dakota Access Pipeline, Spectra Energy’s NEXUS pipeline is a more immediate threat lurking below public radar for Ohio and other Midwestern residents. By 2018, the NEXUS pipeline could potentially occupy over 255 miles of land stretching from Ohio to Western Canada. The pipeline, which will carry natural gas through Ohio, Michigan and Ontario, Canada, has been in the works since 2013. According to the project’s website, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will not determine whether to approve the project until 2017. However, it is highly unlikely that the project will be halted, as it has been in development for more than three...

NEXUS Pipeline May Violate Town Bill of Rights

Jake Berstein

February 12, 2016

As the date of construction looms closer, Oberlin citizens continue to push back against what they believe is Spectra’s Energy disregard of the Oberlin Community Bill of Rights. Spectra Energy has been working to break ground on a natural gas pipeline, but Oberlin residents — and residents throughout Ohio — do not want the pipeline to exist as planned. Local landowners who would be affected by the pipeline have been working with the College’s Students for Energy Justice to create community charters, like the Oberlin Bill of Rights, that would outlaw the transportation of natural gas through their cities. Though plans for the pipeline are constantly in flux, residents are becoming more disheartened as the pipeline...

Please Don’t Feed the Pipelines

Aliza Weidenbaum, Oberlin resident

December 11, 2015

To the Editors: As someone fully opposed to fossil fuel pipelines, I am thrilled that the city of Oberlin is able to engage the help of such an experienced attorney as Carolyn Elefant in litigating to prevent pipelines (not merely rerouting them). We need all the help that we can get. What still needs editorial focus is that Oberlin College built a new gas plant — yes, a new fossil gas-burning — when it can be expected to know better. It is precisely new gas plants — like Oberlin College’s — that “demand” gas from pipelines. Please don’t feed the pipelines. Consider Ball State University in Indiana — much less famous than Oberlin and much bigger, with around 21,000 students — which fac...

City Council Should Focus on Abolishing, Not Rerouting, NEXUS Pipeline

Editorial Board

December 4, 2015

In a special meeting on Monday, Nov. 30, City Council decided to hire the law offices of D.C.-based Carolyn Elefant to represent the city of Oberlin in a lawsuit aimed at rerouting the NEXUS pipeline. The proposed 250-mile pipeline, to be constructed and operated by Houston-based Spectra Energy, is slated to run from Ontario, Canada to Kensington, Ohio — a town just 76 miles southeast of Oberlin. Based on the intended route, the pipeline will run as close as 95 feet from residences on Reserve Avenue as well as near the Welcome Nursing Home and the fire station, among other city buildings. The Medina County-based Coalition to Reroute Nexus, along with the city officials of Green, Ohio, devised a rerouting plan that ...

City Meets Target, Halves Carbon Emissions

City Meets Target, Halves Carbon Emissions

February 20, 2015

The city of Oberlin has met its target of cutting 2012 greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2015. Oberlin emitted 113,832 metric tons of greenhouse gases in 2012 and is projected to emit 56,866 metric tons in 2015, according to analysis done by the consulting firm Cameron-Cole. “In three years, we halved the entire city’s greenhouse gas emissions,” said Sean Hayes, the executive director of the Oberlin Project. The Oberlin Project is an organization that seeks to help Oberlin make progress...

Beat the Chill

Beat the Chill

February 6, 2015

College Makes First Layoffs in More than 10 Years

Oliver Bok, Staff Writer

October 31, 2014

The College is laying off three employees due to the recent switch from coal to natural gas in the College’s heating plant. The three heating plant engineers in question must decide by Nov. 5 either to leave the College entirely or to accept a custodian position with a 35 percent cut to their current pay. “I’ve been here for 33 years. This is the first time that I’ve ever known that the College has [permanently] laid off service workers,” said Milton Wyman, a member of the Oberlin College Facilities department and chairman of the local United Auto Workers, one of the four unions on campus. According to one of the engineers, the layoffs were a result of the fact that the new natural gas heating plant is...

Students Must Mobilize Against Proposed Pipeline Through Oberlin

CJ Blair, Columnist

October 3, 2014

Early during Orientation, another student told me that there were plans to build a natural gas pipeline that would go straight through Oberlin. When I heard this, I almost laughed, because I knew it wouldn’t happen. Surely the students of one of the world’s most politically active colleges would do everything in their power to prevent a project like this. When I joined Oberlin Anti-Frack, however, I realized that this was true only for a small group of students; the campus as a whole was far from being united and ready to mobilize against the pipeline. With several crucial dates in the battle against the Nexus Pipeline just days away, it is without question the most important time to make sure Oberlin students...

Benefits of Transition to Natural Gas Questioned

Rachel Weinstein, Staff Writer

October 11, 2013

Oberlin College is currently gearing up for a new sustainable installment — the replacement of the central heating plant’s coal boilers with new natural gas-fueled tanks. For years, the College has been dependent on a central coal burning plant to heat academic and residential buildings on campus — a solution that only some find acceptable. Separated into multiple zones, buildings on the northeast side of campus will be the first to utilize the new natural gas energy. The initiative will officially break ground next Monday, beginning with the construction of the site for the new boilers. “[Rob Lampaa, director of sustainability] put forward a plan in the last year and the Board of Trustees voted to approve...

Panel Discusses Future of Natural Gas

Robin Wasserman, News Editor

November 30, 2012

Four panelists discussed issues surrounding the use of natural gas last Monday in the second event of a four-part series on how to reach the College’s goal of carbon neutrality by 2025. Associate Professor of Psychology Cindy Frantz said that “natural gas is not an acceptable long-term solution,” but that it is still the most likely short-term source of energy for the College as it heads toward carbon neutrality. The panel, which Frantz said had been organized in response to students’ request for a dialogue on natural gas, addressed issues that confront how the College can use natural gas as a transition fuel. “We’re stuck, I’d say, between a rock and a hard place and a dagger and a gun,” said Frantz...

Panel Discusses Future of Natural Gas

Robin Wasserman, News Editor

November 30, 2012

Four panelists discussed issues surrounding the use of natural gas last Monday in the second event of a four-part series on how to reach the College’s goal of carbon neutrality by 2025. Associate Professor of Psychology Cindy Frantz said that “natural gas is not an acceptable long-term solution,” but that it is still the most likely short-term source of energy for the College as it heads toward carbon neutrality. The panel, which Frantz said had been organized in response to students’ request for a dialogue on natural gas, addressed issues that confront how the College can use natural gas as a transition fuel. “We’re stuck, I’d say, between a rock and a hard place and a dagger and a gun,” said Frantz...

Gas to Power New AMP Plant

Holly Roney and Elise Shulman-Reed

December 4, 2009

The lights in Ohio might soon start to get a little greener. On Nov. 25, American Municipal Power announced that it would be converting its American Municipal Power Generating Station project from a pulverized coal facility to a natural gas combined-cycle facility. As stated in AMP’s press release, the project, which involved 81 communities in Michigan, Ohio, Virginia and West Virginia, was terminated after November cal- culations found that the project would see a 37 percent increase in price. Although environmental activists have been against the coal plant since the project was first announced six years ago, AMP executives have said this was not the cause of its decision. The AMPGS project would have been the...

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