Established 1874.

The Oberlin Review

Tanking Undermines Competitive Nature of Sports

Alex McNicoll, Sports Editor

October 6, 2017

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

Professional sports plays dirty. From performance-enhancing drugs to the NBA fixing the 1985 draft, cheating and out-of-sport advantages have always created unfair playing fields. However, some advantages are more hidden than others. Big market teams like the New York Yankees have been poised to get whichever free agents they want, fast-forwarding the rebuilding process to just a year or two. Meanwhile, for small market teams, such as the Buffalo Bills, it is not so easy to develop into a competitor. A strategy that has been gaining momentum amongst the less fortunate professional teams, however, has finally broken into the mainstream: tanking. In other words, the best way to win in the future is to lose as often as p...

As More Players Kneel, NFL Protest Loses Sight of Original Purpose

Alex McNicoll, Sports Editor

September 29, 2017

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

Before the start of the San Francisco 49ers’ first preseason game of 2016 against the Houston Texans, second-string quarterback Colin Kaepernick decided to stay on the bench. Most people did not notice, as he was far enough down in the depth-chart that he did not even suit up for the game. However, it was the start of his now-infamous national anthem protest that has the whole league kneeling, and somehow, the more people that partake, the further away the protest gets from its original goal. It was not until his third preseason game last year, on Aug. 26, that people began to notice that he was sitting for the anthem. When asked about it after the game, he said he sat because of police brutality and the oppression of...

Government Regulation Allows Capitalism to Succeed

Bob Gross, Oberlin visitor

May 5, 2017

Filed under Letters to the Editors, OPINIONS

To the Editors: In regard to the columns that have appeared in the Review debating libertarian capitalism: While I am a proponent of capitalism, I believe libertarian capitalism would be a disaster. It would be far too easy for the wealthy and powerful to exploit markets in a system of libertarian capitalism. The production of goods and services would be governed by monopolies. An easy illustration for how this would transpire can be seen in the way professional football evolved into a monopoly. At one time there were two separate professional football leagues: the American Football League and the National Football League. The two leagues bid for the services of prospects coming out of college, res...

Cool or Drool: Romo’s Days in Dallas Numbered

Dan Bisno, Columnist

November 18, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

Editor’s Note: This article contains references to domestic violence. Many of the 32 teams in the NFL are struggling to fill the quarterback position. While teams like the San Francisco 49ers and Cleveland Browns cycle through their assortment of sub-par passers and NFL busts like Tim Tebow, who moved on to pursue a career in baseball, the Cowboys are mischievously stockpiling quarterbacks in Dallas. Since week one of the NFL season, rookie quarterback Dak Prescott has led the Dallas Cowboys to an NFC-leading 8–1 start, while famed backups Tony Romo and Mark Sanchez remain benched. Many Cowboys fans had high hopes for Romo this season, but he was sidelined after fracturing his vertebrae at the end of the NFL pre...

Manning Should Set Sights on Graceful Exit

Dan Bisno, Columnist

September 25, 2015

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

Deflategate remains a popular news story giv­en the NFL’s recent announcement that they will appeal the reversal of Tom Brady’s suspension by the district court. While this has yet to develop, Brady’s name creates an interesting segue into this week’s topic: the decline of Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning. As many of you know, Brady and Manning are, almost inargu­ably, the most successful quarterbacks of their generation. They are the guys that get thrown in the GOAT conversation with Joe Montana, Dan Marino, John Elway, Brett Favre, etc. — perhaps because they’re all hardy and covered with hair, but most likely because they are the “greatest of all time.” So what’s up with Manning? First...

Trauma Drama

Sarena Malsin, Sports Editor

September 11, 2015

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

The best way I can de­scribe a seizure is to com­pare it to a dream where it is absolutely imperative that you move, but despite your most concentrated efforts, you realize with dawning terror and limit­ed consciousness that you have no control over your body. I was concussed when I was 12 years old playing defense in a soccer tour­nament for my premier team. It was an unremark­able play — I, a slightly-built spit of a kid, was steamrolled by an attacker twice my size — but this time, instead of popping back up, I stayed down af­ter my head snapped back to meet the ground. My left arm shot up and stayed there for the dura­tion of the two minutes I was seizing, which, ac­cording to witnesses, was a wildly...

Cool or Drool: NFL Offseason Goofs

Dan Bisno, Columnist

September 11, 2015

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

It’s been a little over seven months since Super Bowl XLIX. America’s most watched sport has been on hiatus and, as always, the offseason has been filled with some of the juiciest sports stories of the year, centered around a variety of players. What were these guys thinking? Did they forget that their actions are microanalyzed, maybe more than actors, actresses and musicians? Or maybe they wanted the spotlight. Let’s go over how this works. “Cool or Drool” is a column I traditionally write with fellow junior Henry Weissberg. While he studies abroad in Chile spending an insurmountable amount of time study­ing statistics for fantasy football, I will continue “Cool or Drool” this semester. In a nutshell,...

Suh’s Mega-Deal Top Move of NFL Offseason

Dan Bisno and Henry Weissberg

April 3, 2015

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

We bet you’re wondering what we are going to throw at you this week. Will it be a left jab of basketball analysis? Or a righty uppercut of football talk? Oh yeah, that’s the one. We’re talking NFL. Football! Football! Football! There is no offseason for us. Free agent signings and offseason trades are what keep us warm during the dreary final days of winter. We are here to update you on the most important offseason moves in the NFL. Practically as exciting as the regular NFL season, the offseason is a time when millions are made and championship teams are crafted. With dozens of difference makers available, the offseason is like a trip to Disneyland for general managers. Now, without further ado, the top move...

Belichick Seals Legacy

Nate Levinson, Sports Editor

February 6, 2015

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

Tom Brady was named the Most Valuable Player of Super Bowl XLIX last Sunday, but he wasn’t the most valuable Patriot in the game. That honor goes to Bill Belichick. During his 15-year reign as head coach of the New England Patriots, Belichick has compiled a 175–65 record in the regular season, 21 playoff wins, six Super Bowl appearances and four Super Bowl wins, with the latest coming in a thrilling 28–24 win over the Seattle Seahawks. Though Belichick is the most revered coach in the NFL today, Brady often gets the majority of the credit for the Patriots’ success. However, without Belichick’s guiding hand, there’s no way Brady would have had near the success he’s had. There are a fair share of talented qua...

Cool or Drool: NFL vs. Marshawn Lynch

Dan Bisno and Henry Weissberg

February 6, 2015

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Column

Injury update: Dan Bisno — sophomore, torn labrum. Henry Weissberg — sophomore, torn ACL. We are your sports-injured sports columnists. With only tender memories of fields and hard courts, we turn to pen and paper. Our focus is those off-the-field moments that balance playful antics and near-catastrophes. When does a publicity stunt turn into a potential lawsuit? More importantly, do we think these moments are cool or drool? You might remember Marshawn Lynch, the 215-pound Seattle Seahawks running back, for the 2011 game that earned him the moniker “Beast Mode.” In an upset victory over the New Orleans Saints, Lynch broke nine tackles en route to a 67-yard touchdown scamper; the vibrations from the fans’...

NFL: No Fun League

Nate Levinson, Sports Editor

December 5, 2014

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

I’ve used this column before to express my displeasure with the NFL’s handling of numerous on- and off-field incidents, but as long as it continues to mishandle seemingly every adverse situation thrown its way, I’ll continue to write about the so-called No Fun League. Much of the inspiration for this week’s editorial is owed to controversial Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman and his teammate, wide receiver Doug Baldwin. Last week, the two reigning Super Bowl champs and Stanford alumni ripped the NFL’s decision to fine Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch $100,000 for refusing to speak to the media after a Nov. 16 loss to the Kansas City Chiefs. “You know, the other day Marshawn Lynch got fined $100...

Intent of Racial Slur Can Be Changed

Bob Gross

October 10, 2014

Filed under Letters to the Editors, OPINIONS

To the Editors: I think the word “redskins” has been rehabilitated and no longer can be considered a racial slur. When used as a mascot name, it presents Native Americans in a positive way. Look at the Washington, D.C. professional football team: Native Americans are not depicted scalping white settlers, and the cheerleaders are not represented as squaws. Instead, a noble image of Native Americans is portrayed by the Washington pro football team. A reasonable person might even come to the conclusion that the use of the term “redskins” by the Washington pro football team is something that should be looked on as admirable. The connotations associated with a word can change over time — for example, the...

Established 1874.