The Oberlin Review

Ohlsson Performs Centenary Scriabin Recital

Jeremy Reynolds, Staff Writer

February 13, 2015

After delivering a thunderous final arpeggio, pianist Garrick Ohlsson leapt from the keyboard to claim his accolades before the last notes of Alexander Scriabin’s fifth sonata had even finished reverberating through the hall. The wild enthusiasm of his listeners prompted Ohlsson to give not one but three encores after Tuesday night’s installment of the Artist Recital Series, which featured works for solo piano by Ludwig van Beethoven, Franz Schubert and Scriabin in Finney Chapel.   Ohlsson, who hails from White Plains, NY, began his studies at the Juilliard School at age 13. The only American pianist to have won the prestigious International Chopin Competition in Warsaw, Ohlsson is widely recognized as...

Understated Opening to Standing Ovation: Faculty Recital Kicks Off Series

Jarrett Hoffman, Staff Writer

September 12, 2014

Around 9:30 p.m., Sept. 4, Conservatory faculty members emerged from the backstage of Warner Concert Hall to a near-rockstar reception. A swarm of students had gathered in the hallway around the hall’s exit to shower their professors with whoops of adoration for the strong performance that they had just given, a concert of Mozart and Brahms quintets to open this season’s Faculty Chamber Music Series. Rarely performed — a forgotten third-stringer getting called up for the big game — the first work on the program was Mozart’s String Quintet No. 2 in C Minor. This piece was no slouch, however, and was certainly up to the task of kicking off the series. It is one of Mozart’s six “viola” quintets, each...

Love and Loss in Three Tongues: LeFebvre’s Performance Wows Crowd in Warner

Daniel Hautzinger, Staff Writer

February 7, 2014

English, German, Italian, gibberish: Associate Professor of Singing Timothy LeFebvre can do them all. In a diverse Jan. 31 recital in Warner Concert Hall, with Professor of Instrumental Accompanying James Howsmon on piano, LeFebvre demonstrated his facility with all these languages, as well as his impressive voice and sensitivity to text. LeFebvre’s song is like a father’s strong, comforting hand tucking a child into bed. His voice has a substantial weight behind it and the capacity for great power, but the strength is comforting rather than intimidating. The first half of the program demonstrated that quiet potency especially well. Handel’s arias “Where’er You Walk,” from the opera Semele and “Frondi tenere…...

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