The Oberlin Review

Retribution, Restitution, and Race in Ohio

Ava Zuschlag, Contributing Writer

September 20, 2019

 Five years ago, Tamir Rice is shot and killed. In the aftermath, several things happen. The two officers who responded to the call, who fired the shots, are temporarily reassigned to more menial positions. Tamir’s family files a wrongful death suit against the officers and the city of Cleveland. Almost a year and a half later, “in an effort to reduce taxpayer liabilities,” the city agrees to pay the Rice family a six million dollar settlement.  This year, a thirty-minute drive away from Cleveland, Gibson’s Bakery wins damages for defamation. After a shoplifting incident ended in violence, student accusations of the shop owner’s racism negatively affected the business. In the judgement, the jury awards ...

Students hold signs expressing a variety of demands outside Friday’s trustee dinner, including what many idenify as the College’s complicity in the systemic oppression of people of color. This week, some are pressuring the administration to temporarily suspend the standard grading system in the wake of nationwide protests and conflict following the deaths of Michael Brown, Eric Garner and Tamir Rice.

Students Fight for Academic Leniency

December 12, 2014

As of Thursday evening, over 1,300 students had signed a petition drafted by College junior Kiki Acey and other students of color demanding President Krislov suspend the standard grading system in the aftermath of the high-profile cases of Michael Brown, Eric Garner and Tamir Rice. The deaths of these three Black males — as well as the non-indictments of the white officers who killed Brown and Garner — have gained national attention as representative of the country’s historic and ...

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