Conservatory Professor Celebrates Grammy Nomination

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Conservatory Professor Celebrates Grammy Nomination

Last week, Assistant Professor of Harp Yolanda Kondonassis was nominated for a Grammy Award in the Best Classical Instrumental Solo category for her world premiere recording of Jennifer Higdon’s “Harp Concerto.”
Kondonassis — no stranger to accolades — is considered one of the best solo harpists in the world. This is her second Grammy nomination, and she was also awarded the 2011 Cleveland Arts Prize.
In addition to her work in music, Kondonassis is also a driven climate activist. She has donated her royalties from several projects to environmental nonprofit organizations, and she is the founder and director of Earth at Heart, an organization that encourages climate activism through an artistic lens. She also authored an environmentalist children’s book, Our House is Round: A Kid’s Book About Why Protecting Our Earth Matters.
Kondonassis’ music career started when she picked her instrument as a child.
“I started playing the harp at the age of nine, and it was actually my mom’s idea,” Kondonassis wrote in an email to the Review. “I think she thought the angelic qualities of the instrument would rub off on me! I’ve often said that instead of me becoming more angelic with the harp, I’m afraid that my forty-five years of promoting this instrument have probably made the harp a little less angelic as a result of me.”
Despite Kondonassis’ humility, her many talents have made a mark on music history and the environment alike.

Last week, Assistant Professor of Harp Yolanda Kondonassis was nominated for a Grammy Award in the Best Classical Instrumental Solo category for her world premiere recording of Jennifer Higdon’s “Harp Concerto.” Kondonassis — no stranger to accolades — is considered one of the best solo harpists in the world. This is her second Grammy nomination, and she was also awarded the 2011 Cleveland Arts Prize. In addition to her work in music, Kondonassis is also a driven climate activist. She has donated her royalties from several projects to environmental nonprofit organizations, and she is the founder and director of Earth at Heart, an organization that encourages climate activism through an artistic lens. She also authored an environmentalist children’s book, Our House is Round: A Kid’s Book About Why Protecting Our Earth Matters. Kondonassis’ music career started when she picked her instrument as a child. “I started playing the harp at the age of nine, and it was actually my mom’s idea,” Kondonassis wrote in an email to the Review. “I think she thought the angelic qualities of the instrument would rub off on me! I’ve often said that instead of me becoming more angelic with the harp, I’m afraid that my forty-five years of promoting this instrument have probably made the harp a little less angelic as a result of me.” Despite Kondonassis’ humility, her many talents have made a mark on music history and the environment alike.

Photo courtesy of Yolanda Kondonassis

Last week, Assistant Professor of Harp Yolanda Kondonassis was nominated for a Grammy Award in the Best Classical Instrumental Solo category for her world premiere recording of Jennifer Higdon’s “Harp Concerto.” Kondonassis — no stranger to accolades — is considered one of the best solo harpists in the world. This is her second Grammy nomination, and she was also awarded the 2011 Cleveland Arts Prize. In addition to her work in music, Kondonassis is also a driven climate activist. She has donated her royalties from several projects to environmental nonprofit organizations, and she is the founder and director of Earth at Heart, an organization that encourages climate activism through an artistic lens. She also authored an environmentalist children’s book, Our House is Round: A Kid’s Book About Why Protecting Our Earth Matters. Kondonassis’ music career started when she picked her instrument as a child. “I started playing the harp at the age of nine, and it was actually my mom’s idea,” Kondonassis wrote in an email to the Review. “I think she thought the angelic qualities of the instrument would rub off on me! I’ve often said that instead of me becoming more angelic with the harp, I’m afraid that my forty-five years of promoting this instrument have probably made the harp a little less angelic as a result of me.” Despite Kondonassis’ humility, her many talents have made a mark on music history and the environment alike.

Photo courtesy of Yolanda Kondonassis

Photo courtesy of Yolanda Kondonassis

Last week, Assistant Professor of Harp Yolanda Kondonassis was nominated for a Grammy Award in the Best Classical Instrumental Solo category for her world premiere recording of Jennifer Higdon’s “Harp Concerto.” Kondonassis — no stranger to accolades — is considered one of the best solo harpists in the world. This is her second Grammy nomination, and she was also awarded the 2011 Cleveland Arts Prize. In addition to her work in music, Kondonassis is also a driven climate activist. She has donated her royalties from several projects to environmental nonprofit organizations, and she is the founder and director of Earth at Heart, an organization that encourages climate activism through an artistic lens. She also authored an environmentalist children’s book, Our House is Round: A Kid’s Book About Why Protecting Our Earth Matters. Kondonassis’ music career started when she picked her instrument as a child. “I started playing the harp at the age of nine, and it was actually my mom’s idea,” Kondonassis wrote in an email to the Review. “I think she thought the angelic qualities of the instrument would rub off on me! I’ve often said that instead of me becoming more angelic with the harp, I’m afraid that my forty-five years of promoting this instrument have probably made the harp a little less angelic as a result of me.” Despite Kondonassis’ humility, her many talents have made a mark on music history and the environment alike.

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