The Oberlin Review

OCircus! Leaps Back to the Future with Time Travel Show

OCircus! Leaps Back to the Future with Time Travel Show

May 6, 2011

ountless children have dreamed of running away to the circus, but what about time traveling away? Last weekend, College first-years Annie Minette and William Passannante and College junior Daniella Sanchez did just that before excited audiences in A Circus in Time, OCircus!’s spring show. The trio adeptly played a group of amateur scientists toying with lab equipment better left untouched. As a result of their folly, they sent themselves hurling through time in a machine that sounded remar...

Dance Review Overlooks Diversity

Nusha Martynuk

April 29, 2011

Filed under ARTS, Dance

To the Editors: The review of the Spring Back dance concert by Claire Petras [The Oberlin Review, April 25] ended with this quote: “… hopefully in the future, the Oberlin dance department will be more willing to step out of the limiting prescriptions of modern dance and prominently feature even more inventive, energetic pieces that incorporate other dance forms.” This concert included seven dances, four of which were profoundly influenced by forms outside the “modern” tradition: Capoeira Angola, which is taught here by Justin Emeka; Hip-Hop, which will be featured as the dance program’s big Winter Term project in 2012; Chinese sword dance, offered by our visiting faculty member, Yu Xiao; and tap, by College...

Spring Back Concert Teeters Toward Sameness

Claire Petras, Staff Writer

April 22, 2011

Filed under ARTS, Dance

“What was your favorite piece?” This was the question I asked my classmates after attending the Spring Back dance concert last weekend. Surprisingly, the response to this query was quite uniform, with most citing either College first-year Jess Gersony’s tap piece Heartbeats or visiting assistant professor of dance Yu Xiao’s duet At the Edge as their favorites. This split response was interesting, precisely because these two pieces were without a doubt the most distinct of the entire performance. Gersony’s tap piece was an energetic tap sequence set to José Gonzalez’s Heartbeats, a lovely, melancholic song. The juxtaposition of the song with the music initially struck the viewer as somewhat haphaza...

Haydée Souffrant Reinvigorates with Senior Dance Show To Say the Words, to Speak the Truth

Claire Petras

March 18, 2011

Filed under ARTS, Dance

Equal parts performance art, spectacular drumming, traditional Guinean dancing, singing and spoken word, College senior Haydée Souffrant’s senior show addressed her personal struggle to navigate her relationship with her familial history. To Say the Words, to Speak the Truth; Following the Sound of Legacies was refreshing. It was exciting to finally see a dance performance at Oberlin that was not a vapid modern dance piece. Souffrant’s performance was anything but empty. The piece’s energy, soul and emotion resounded throughout the crowd in Warner Main Space. The space was decorated with large draped banners listing the names of her family members and her mantra, “Lakie ou se Kote Historie Kommence,” ...

Super Blown: The Super Halftime Show Disappoints Yet Again

James Blankenship, Sports Editor

February 11, 2011

Filed under ARTS, Dance, Music, SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

Every time the overhyped monstrosity that is Super Bowl week graces us with its presence, a nation is left wondering, “Can this halftime show really be worse than last year’s?” In the last five years, a spectacle that has become more celebrated than several national holidays (I’m talking to you, Columbus Day) has failed to produce a mistake-free halftime show, let alone one that’s actually entertaining. At this point, it’s difficult to think of a 30-minute event that isn’t more deserving of our time. Even a re-run of Friends provides an opportunity to appreciate the acting repertoire of a young Jennifer Aniston. That being said, the people who consistently treat their Super Bowl viewing parties more lik...

Litoff Building Already Earns Award

Alexandria Cho, Staff Writer

December 11, 2009

Filed under ARTS, Campus News, Dance, NEWS

The Litoff building — the newest addition to the Conservatory and soon-to-be-home of jazz studies, music history and music theory — is making fast progress in ways that transcend its construction schedule. The American Institute of Architects recently recognized the building and architect Westlake Reed Leskosky for excellence and sustainability, with the AIA Western Mountain Region 2009 Honor Award for Unbuilt Work. According to an Oberlin press release available online, students will have access to “a world-class recording studio; flexible rehearsal and performance spaces; teaching studios and practice rooms; a glass-enclosed social hub for interaction; and an archive for the largest private jazz recording...

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