The Oberlin Review

Legislature Must Consider HB 6

Scott Medwid, Oberlin Resident

December 13, 2019

 I am writing in response to last week’s article “House Bill 6 Poses Serious Environmental, Health Risks” (The Oberlin Review, Dec. 6, 2019). I was involved in the multi-year campaign to keep the Lake Erie-based nuclear electric generators open and operating. The Ohio Public Utilities Commission reports that 15 percent of Ohio’s total electrical generation volume comes from these facilities. This electricity is provided to customers 24 hours a day, seven days a week, regardless of the weather. The electricity is generated by the fission of uranium in nuclear reactors — a process that is highly monitored, maintained, regulated, and inspected. The Ohio PUC reports that 11 million tons of carbon, 18,000 ton...

House Bill 6 Poses Serious Environmental, Health Risks

Klara Jacobs, Contributing Writer

December 6, 2019

 The debate over Ohio House Bill 6 — which outlines a seven-year program that will subsidize Ohio’s two major nuclear power plants — has implications far beyond what one may presume. Effective as of October, HB 6 suggests that this subsidy will produce a large-scale increase in environmental and economic payoff from the plants.  The two plants, Perry and Davis-Besse, are run by FirstEnergy Solutions, a bankrupt subsidiary of Ohio’s major energy production company. FirstEnergy threatened to shut down the plants in 2020 unless subsidies were provided for their continuation. Ohio lawmakers approved HB 6 in July, meaning that fees, capped at 85 cents per month, will be added to taxpayers’ electricity bills. ...

Industrialization Affects Global Community, Weather Patterns

Sophia Ottoni-Wilhelm, Contributing Writer

April 10, 2015

2014 was the hottest year in recorded history, and scientists are scrambling over one another to attribute the temperature hike to something, or someone in particular. “Over the past 30 years or so, man-made emission centers have shifted from traditional industrialized countries to fast-developing countries in Asia,” NASA physicist Jonathan Jiang said in an interview on NPR last week. China, one of the most populous countries in the world, is predicted to be contributing enough coal waste to affect the severity of winters in the United States. The National Academy of Sciences published a report on the effects of coal-fueled production on the atmosphere. Satellite imagery collected over the course of the past decade...

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