The Oberlin Review

Graph of projected hospital bed capacity needed to combat the COVID-19 outbreak in Ohio. Data is displayed for April 20, the projected statewide peak date. Graph courtesy of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington.

Ohio Generally Prepared for COVID-19 Outbreak, Data Models Suggest

March 31, 2020

As the COVID-19 outbreak continues to spread across the country, statistical models produced by public health professionals show that, in comparison to other states, Ohio is well-prepared to weather the pandemic. While statewide testing rates continue to lag behind national averages, Ohio’s capacity of available hospital beds is projected to be sufficient to handle the peak of the outbreak. As of Monday afternoon, 27,275 COVID-19 tests had been conducted across the state, with 1,933 positiv...

In Congressional Race, Third-Party Candidate Could Split Vote, Take Down Jim Jordan

Editorial Board

March 6, 2020

 With Ohio’s March 17 primary elections rapidly approaching, the Editorial Board anticipates that many students are well-prepared to make a selection in the presidential race — especially given that the Democratic campaign has narrowed to two viable challengers, Senator Bernie Sanders and Former Vice President Joe Biden. However, many voters remain less informed about the developments in local races.  In particular, we are tracking the race to nominate a Democratic congressional candidate for this fall’s general election. Currently, three Democrats are competing for the nomination: moderates Shannon Freshour and Jeff Sites, and self-described progressive Mike Larsen. All three hope to beat Congressperson ...

In Congressional Race, Let the Boys Fight; A Woman Will Prevail

Ilana Foggle, Columnist

February 28, 2020

 For the past year and a half, we have seen constant coverage of one primary and one primary only: the Democratic presidential primary. At this point, many Oberlin students and community members have already decided who they will be voting for as the Democratic nominee for president. Yet, if you asked Oberlin students who is running for Congress in our district, most would be at a loss for words.  Perhaps this is due to the fact that students see no scenario in which a Democratic opponent unseats Republican incumbent Representative Jim Jordan in our heinously gerrymandered district. Well, for the first time since Oberlin was gerrymandered into Ohio’s 4th congressional district, I can say with absolute confidence that we ...

Ohio Trans Health Care Policy Will Harm Trans Youth

Abigail Kopp, Contributing Writer

February 21, 2020

 Republican representatives Ron Hood of Asheville and Bill Dean of Xenia introduced the so-called “Protect Vulnerable Children Act” to the Ohio Statehouse on Feb. 11. While the name has positive connotations of protecting innocent youth, this could not be further from the truth.  The tricky title is just another attempt by congressional Republicans to both confuse liberals and persuade conservative voters into supporting a heinous, harmful bill. If passed, doctors could be charged with a third-degree felony for attempting to provide gender-affirming medical care to transgender minors.  Hood explained his reasoning behind introducing this bill stating: “My number one concern, by far and away, is the irreversible nat...

Richard Romero, U.S. Census Bureau partnership specialist, discusses the importance of Census participation at the Oberlin Public Library last Monday.

Concerns Over Low Participation in U.S. Census Loom Over Ohio’s Future

February 7, 2020

With the U.S. Census approaching this spring, local activists and government officials are working to ensure that all residents of Lorain County are counted. The census is a once-a-decade process by which the federal government counts the population and gathers demographic data on all residents of the U.S. “We only have a shot every 10 years,” said County Commissioner Sharon Sweda, who is part of the Complete Count Committee for Lorain County, a group of nonprofit organizations, school districts...

Legislature Must Consider HB 6

Scott Medwid, Oberlin Resident

December 13, 2019

 I am writing in response to last week’s article “House Bill 6 Poses Serious Environmental, Health Risks” (The Oberlin Review, Dec. 6, 2019). I was involved in the multi-year campaign to keep the Lake Erie-based nuclear electric generators open and operating. The Ohio Public Utilities Commission reports that 15 percent of Ohio’s total electrical generation volume comes from these facilities. This electricity is provided to customers 24 hours a day, seven days a week, regardless of the weather. The electricity is generated by the fission of uranium in nuclear reactors — a process that is highly monitored, maintained, regulated, and inspected. The Ohio PUC reports that 11 million tons of carbon, 18,000 ton...

Ohio Remains a Swing State

Editorial Board

November 15, 2019

 This weekend marks exactly four months before the Democratic presidential primary election in Ohio. The fate of the 2020 presidential election hinges partly on the outcome of swing states, such as Ohio, so it is crucial for the Democratic Party to swing this state in their favor this time around.  In the 2016 presidential election, Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton by eight points in Ohio. However, the final tally does not tell the whole story, as the race was extremely close or skewed toward Clinton in several counties across the state. In Lorain County, Clinton won by only a tenth of a percent, but in Cuyahoga County — Cleveland’s home county — she won with 65 percent of the vote. Despite winning al...

In-State Students Discuss Culture Shock, Cancel Culture

Aly Fogel, Arts & Culture Editor

November 1, 2019

 Oberlin College is so distinctive from Northeast Ohio that driving just 10 minutes away can feel like entering another world. An oddball-liberal college in a state that voted red in 2016, Oberlin is uniquely positioned. For students who come from conservative areas in Ohio, the transition to Oberlin College culture can be a disorienting experience, despite their hometown’s geographical proximity.  “It’s so crazy how different it is,” said Paige Monyak, a second-year College student from Elyria. “When people say it’s like a bubble here, it’s like an actual bubble. … Right when you pass the [Allen Memorial] Art Museum [and step] on campus, it’s just completely different.”  College fourth-year S...

Democratic presidential candidates stand on stage at the Oct. 15 Democratic debate, hosted at Otterbein University by CNN and The New York Times.

Democratic Debate Propels Ohio to Center Stage

November 1, 2019

Twelve candidates for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination descended on Westerville, OH, on Tuesday, Oct. 15, to take part in a three-hour debate hosted by CNN and The New York Times. Many of the candidates came out swinging, attempting to highlight ideological divides and set themselves apart from the field. Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren became a lightning rod for critique from other candidates, especially on the issue of health care. Other clashes focused on foreign polic...

National Popular Vote Represents Opportunity for Ohio

Editorial Board

September 27, 2019

 This week, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi announced a formal impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, a step that many felt she should have taken months ago. Calls for Trump’s impeachment date back to 2016, just after he became the second presidential candidate since 2000 to win the White House despite losing the popular vote. Trump’s popular vote loss also spurred a conversation that had nothing to do with the candidate himself, but everything to do with how he was elected. In a functional democracy, should elections regularly be won by candidates who lose the popular vote? It’s a question that many have asked themselves after November 2016 — and it’s the question that the National Popular Vot...

Solidarity Vital in Confronting Anti-Abortion Legislation

Editorial Board

May 24, 2019

 In recent weeks, reproductive rights have come under attack in numerous states across the country — most notably Alabama, Georgia, and Ohio. Ohio’s “heartbeat bill,” one of the first to be passed in 2019, bans abortion after six weeks into a pregnancy and makes no exceptions for cases of rape or incest. Furthermore, doctors who do not test for a heartbeat or proceed with abortion procedures if a heartbeat is detected could be charged with a fifth-degree felony, punishable by up to a year in jail and a $2,000 fine. Although Ohio’s is far from the most restrictive abortion law in the county — Alabama’s makes even fewer allowances — it still drastically limits abortion access.  Many of these bills ...

Heartbeat Bill Represents Skewed Priorities for Ohio Governor, State Legislature

Jackie Brant, Opinions Editor

April 12, 2019

 The infamous “heartbeat bill” passed the Ohio state legislature this Wednesday, and after several years of emotional debates, numerous vetoes, and amendments to the bill, Governor Mike DeWine officially signed the bill on Thursday night. The passage of this bill effectively hinders every woman’s ability to get an abortion in the state of Ohio.  Ohio now has the most restrictive abortion laws in the country. The bill bans abortion after six weeks into a pregnancy and makes no exceptions for cases of rape or incest. Furthermore, doctors who do not test for a heartbeat or proceed with abortion procedures if a heartbeat is detected will be charged with a fifth-degree felony, punishable by up to a year in jail and a ...

Established 1874.