The Oberlin Review

Scuffles Between Musicians and Politicians Highlight National Divide

Levi Dayan

November 9, 2018

Filed under ARTS, Arts, Music

Another election season means, as always, another round of politicians being told to stop using artists’ music without permission. Most recently, Pharrell Williams issued a cease and desist letter to President Trump after rally organizers used his song “Happy” at a campaign event in Indiana. In his letter to the president, Williams’ attorney Howard King denounced the song choice in the wake of October’s fatal shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue. “There was nothing ‘happy’ about the tragedy inflicted upon our country on Saturday and no permission was granted for your use of this song for this purpose,” King wrote. The same week, after “Don’t Stop The Music” played at another rally, Rihanna...

Students Rally Against Kavanaugh

Students Rally Against Kavanaugh

October 12, 2018

Editor’s Note: This article contains mention of sexual assault. Oberlin students rallied in Cleveland in a series of protests against the confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the United States Supreme Court last week. The demonstrations began Thursday, Oct. 4 with a sit-in at Senator Rob Portman’s Cleveland office, and ended with a march through downtown Cleveland Saturday, hours before Kavanaugh’s confirmation. “It would be a complete atrocity and a perversion of the ...

Dr. Ridha Moumni Speaks on Tunisian Art, History

Imani Badillo

October 5, 2018

Filed under ARTS, Visual Art

The Art History department hosted Dr. Ridha Moumni in Hallock Auditorium Tuesday, Oct. 2 for his presentation, “Art, Life, and Politics in Post-War and Postcolonial Tunisia.” Moumni’s presentation discussed how the aesthetic of Tunisian art was influenced over time by political actions in and around the country. Located in North Africa and bordered by the Mediterranean Sea, Tunisia gained its independence in 1956. Although the French never officially colonized Tunisia like they did neighboring Algeria, they established a protectorate in 1881. Although the governmental structure was preserved, Tunisian ministers were still appointed, and the bey remained the official monarch, supreme authority was passed to the...

Law Scholars Program Suspended for 2018–2019

Tess Joosse, Staff Writer

April 13, 2018

Filed under Features, NEWS

The Oberlin Law Scholars Program — a year-long program intended to prepare students interested in law with relevant academic and work experience — will not be offered for the 2018–2019 school year, due to the expenditure of the alumni gift that previously funded it. “The Law Scholars Program was funded by a generous alumni gift, which has now been expended,” Oberlin Vice President and Dean of Students Meredith Raimondo wrote in an email to the Review. The program was offered to sophomores and juniors and admittance was selective based on an application. At the program’s center was a one-module Legal Advocacy course, which was taught by a magistrate and included a mock trial and training in legal writing....

Typhoon’s Fourth Album Boasts Wrenching Narrative, Charged Politics

Christian Bolles, Editor-in-Chief

February 9, 2018

Filed under ARTS, Music

“Listen. Of everything that you’re about to lose, this will be the most painful.” This sentence is spoken with slight variations — not sung — exactly three times in eight-piece indie rock band Typhoon’s latest album, Offerings. The words bear the distinct voice of frontman Kyle Morton — tinged with desperation, approaching tears. It’s an appropriate affectation given the trauma of a severe teenage case of Lyme disease that led to multiple organ failures. Here, this history lends Morton a deft touch for handling the possibility of death with unique aromanticism. That sensibility is lucky for listeners; across the album’s nearly 70-minute sprawl, there is consolation in the quiet moments, when the swellin...

Oberlin Alum Explores Family, Food, Humanity in Memoir

Oberlin Alum Explores Family, Food, Humanity in Memoir

September 15, 2017

In his new book Heavy: An American Memoir, Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Mississippi, Kiese Laymon, OC ’98, discusses his “family’s relationship to food, sexual violence, and weight.” Heavy explores Laymon’s interpretation of the lessons he learned as a child from his mother and grandmother, and the role of language as a powerful protective force for Black folks in white spaces. Last Monday, Oberlin was fortunate enough to host Professor Laymon for a ...

Off the Cuff: Teresa Bejan, Professor of Political Theory

April 14, 2017

Teresa Bejan is an Associate Professor of Political Theory at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Oriel College. Before teaching at Oxford, Bejan worked at the University of Toronto and was a Mellon Research Fellow in the Society of Fellows at Columbia University. Bejan’s research brings perspectives from early modern English and American political thought into conversation with contemporary political theory and practice. She has published work in The Journal of Politics, History of Political...

Off the Cuff: Jodi Dean, Professor of Political Science

Off the Cuff: Jodi Dean, Professor of Political Science

March 10, 2017

Jodi Dean is a Political Science professor at Hobart and William Smith Colleges and has written multiple books on political theory and communist revolution. Dean’s 2016 book, Crowds and Party, explains why movements such as Occupy Wall Street were unable to maintain momentum after they ended and explains how the left should reinvigorate itself. Dean’s talk, “Crowds and Party: Movements, Organizing, and Fighting Back,” is the Oscar Jászi Memoral Lecture hosted by the Politics department. Mu...

Off the Cuff: Gary Shteyngart, OC ‘95, Author and Professor

Off the Cuff: Gary Shteyngart, OC ‘95, Author and Professor

April 1, 2016

Gary Shteyngart, OC ’95, has written several novels and recently published his first memoir, Little Failure. His novels include works such as The Russian Debutante’s Handbook, Absurdistan and Super Sad True Love Story. Shteyngart previously taught writing at Hunter College and now teaches at Columbia University. He is a Jewish Russian-American immigrant, an experience that often comes through in his novels, and was born in what is now St. Petersburg, Russia. Shteyngart has been awarded the Stephen...

Lying Embedded in Political Tradition

James Millette, Professor Emeritus, Africana Studies

May 8, 2015

Filed under Letters to the Editors, OPINIONS

To the Editor: Poor Brian Williams! Now that we are all sticklers for truth, we just have no place in our noble profession for those who are fiddling with it. Tut! Tut! Time was when it was a hallmark of our profession to place false stories in random places so that they could be picked up as “sources” for more stories that could be laundered to look like truth, no matter how they smelled. Does this mean that lying is now extinct in the journalistic profession? That Iraq really was invaded to find WMDs? That the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) is a job-killer? That the minimum wage should not be raised because it will kill the economy? That billionaires should be paid million-dollar incomes in order to grow...

Jewish Community Must Include Diverse Politics

Oberlin College Hillel

April 10, 2015

Filed under Letters to the Editors, OPINIONS

To the Editor: We, the undersigned members of the Oberlin Jewish community and of Oberlin College Hillel, publicly announce our support of the Freedom Summer Veterans panel held on April 8, 2015. Inspired by their deep-seated Jewish values, these three activists have devoted their lives to social justice. We are grateful to have had them come speak on Oberlin’s campus and had a moving experience listening and learning from Dorothy Zellner, Ira Grupper and Larry Rubin, as well as Professor Pam Brooks, chair of the Africana Studies department here at Oberlin. Some of us disagree with their stated stances on Israel-Palestine, and some of us agree with them. But all of us feel that their voices must be welcome in our...

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