The Oberlin Review

Protests Power Positive Change

Jackie McDermott, Sports Editor

September 16, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

I’m not here to comment on whether or not Colin Kaepernick is a patriot. Why? Because I’m white. As Kaepernick puts his knee to the gridiron and closes his eyes during those first trumpeted notes of the national anthem, he contemplates stereotypes, fears, anxieties and obstacles that I could never fathom. He pictures the faces of people that looked just like him, splashed onto TV screens as the newest tragic casualties of police brutality. My America is not the same as Kaepernick’s America. The same goes for so many white fans and journalists calling his gesture everything from disrespectful to a heinous affront to veterans and current service members. Why are these onlookers so outraged about one football...

Athletics Expands Sports-Medicine

Sloane Garelick

September 2, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

The Oberlin College Department of Athletics and Physical Education kicked off a groundbreaking partnership with University Hospitals this semester. The program promises to provide student-athletes with additional medical care and puts the College in line with comparable colleges in the region. “We’re right up there as far as what kind of medical coverage we have now,” Senior Associate Director of Athletics Creg Jantz said. “[We are] top of the line compared to other schools. I’d say previously we were toward the bottom, and now we’re at the top.” The partnership with UH is highlighted by the addition of three new physicians to the Oberlin College Sports Medicine team: Dr. James Voos, who specializes...

Play for Pride, Not Points in Olympic Tennis

September 2, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

What does a combination of pure joy and absolute disbelief look like? The look on Mónica Puig’s face as she flung her neon yellow Babolat Pure Aero onto hallowed Olympic ground, raised two fists in the air and marveled at her unbelievable achievement. The scrappy, passionate 22-year-old, ranked number 35 in the world at the start of Olympic tennis, had just become the Cinderella champion of a draw laden with major champions, including four-time gold medalist Serena Williams. As Puig sank to the ground in amazement, she rejoiced not due to any gain in Women’s Tennis Association ranking points that would rocket her to the top of the tour, but because she was overwhelmed with the weight of the pride she had brought...

New on ESPN: a Woman

Sarena Malsin, Sports Editor

May 16, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

For a player with a stand­out legacy and athletic career, Abby Wambach is following a pretty traditional post-re­tirement path for a profes­sional athlete: She’s becom­ing a contributing analyst for ESPN. Wambach, who announced her retirement in October 2015 and played her last game with the Women’s National team in December, said on Wednesday that she will be kicking off her time with the network by cover­ing the European Champion­ships in France in June and the Rio Olympics in August. According to ESPN, she’ll also be working with ESPN Films and other shows, like E:60 and Outside the Lines, which is an investigative show delv­ing into sports controversies, societal issues and athletes’ personal stories....

Players Of The Week: Preying Manti

Players Of The Week: Preying Manti

May 6, 2016

Sophomore Maya Howard-Watts jumps to make the grab against Swarthmore College Saturday. In Oberlin’s first Ultimate Frisbee tournament in decades, the Preying Manti faced teams from Haverford College, Swarthmore College, Xavier University, Ohio Wesleyan University and Lehigh University. During the qualifying rounds on Saturday the squad went 2–2. On Sunday, the team didn’t lose a game heading into the championship match against Haverford College. With the score tied at 6–6 on a universe point...

Anderson Seeks Scholars, Athletes

Scott Rivlin

April 29, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

The Oberlin football coaching staff recently an­nounced plans to host a one-day prospect camp on May 14. The goal of the camp is to bolster the program for future seasons by attract­ing recruits with potential both on the field and in the classroom. The camp will be open to any high school student graduating in 2017 or 2018 and will be structured simi­larly to a combine. Athletes will be evaluated based on physical attributes such as height and weight and will complete speed tests like the 40-yard dash and the three-cone drill. They will also be tested using position-specif­ic drills. In addition to demon­strating their skills to the Oberlin football coaching staff, the prospect camp will give recruits the...

Let the Kids Play

Randy Ollie, Sports Editor

April 29, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

You might remember that I called out the Unit­ed States Men’s National Team a while back for looking completely out of sorts heading into the 2016 Centennial Copa America tournament this summer. I continue to stand by that statement. The men’s team is in trouble, not just for the invitational tourna­ment this summer but also for the 2018 World Cup in Russia. However, there may be a slight glimmer of hope for USMNT fans. His name is Christian Pulisic. Last month, at only 17 years old, the Hershey, PA, native be­came the youngest player to score two goals in the history of the Bundesliga, Germany’s professional soccer league. He is also the youngest non-German to score in the Bundesliga for his Borussia Dortmund...

Rio Looks Risky

Sarena Malsin, Sports Editor

April 22, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

In the ongoing debate over whether countries outside Western Europe or North America should host international sporting events like the Olympics and the World Cup, two conflicting points emerge. On one hand, the international nature of these competitions should reflect and represent the entire world, not just countries with the most power or global representation. But on the other, what is the cost? The economies and political structures of many potential non-Western host countries may not be able to support these events. Recent catastrophes in Brazil, with about three months left until the 2016 Summer Olympics is scheduled to begin in Rio de Janeiro, are bringing this hosting debate back to the surface — especially...

Athletes Explore Relationship Escalation

Randy Ollie, Sports Editor

April 22, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

Student-athletes gathered at the Knowlton Athletics Complex Monday night for Oberlin’s first One Love Escalation Workshop. One Love Foundation was started in 2010 after Yeardley Love, a senior lacrosse player at the University of Virginia, was beaten to death by her ex-boyfriend three weeks shy of graduation. Love’s parents started the foundation with the goal of increasing awareness about relationship violence and outlining the hallmarks of healthy relationships. The workshop began with a film screening on the escalation of violence in relationships. The film begins with what first appears to be a healthy relationship. Different kinds of scenarios are depicted, many of which reflect ways in which young adult...

Golden State of Mind

Randy Ollie, Sports Editor

April 15, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

Wednesday night was one many fans of the Na­tional Basketball Associa­tion will never forget. Not only did the Gold­en State Warriors break the 1995–1996 Chicago Bulls’ regular season re­cord of 72 wins by defeat­ing the Memphis Grizzlies 125–104, but prolific point guard Stephen Curry broke his own single-season re­cord of made three-point­ers by tallying his 400th in the third quarter. Simul­taneously, iconic shooting guard Kobe Bryant scored 60 points in his final game as a Los Angeles Laker, marking the sixth time in his storied career that he has scored 60 or more points in a game. Fur­thermore, Bryant’s efforts helped the Lakers defeat the Utah Jazz 101–96, ef­fectively capping a tumul­tuous...

Show Me the Money

Sarena Malsin, Sports Editor

April 8, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

This might be a shocking statement to throw down, so bear with me here: The professional sports world is rife with sexism. Recently, the U.S. Women’s National Team, already known for speaking out against homophobia and various unfair sporting practices, did something about it. On Wednesday, March 30, five popular, professional soccer players on the USWNT — goalkeeper Hope Solo, co-captains Carli Lloyd and Becky Sauerbrunn, forward Alex Morgan and midfielder Megan Rapinoe — filed a federal complaint to accuse U.S. Soccer, the U.S.’s soccer governing body, of wage discrimination. On top of having to use inferior facilities and being generally overlooked by an organization created to ensure regularity and safety...

World Cup Woes

Randy Ollie, Sports Editor

April 1, 2016

Filed under SPORTS, Sports Editorials & Features

While the next World Cup is more than two years away, the United States is in desperate need for a team identity, as well as a consistent starting lineup. After a disappointing 2–0 loss to Guatemala last week by the United States Men’s National Team, American soccer fans were left scratching their heads in a state of utter bewil­derment. Even disregard­ing that Guatemala was ranked 95th in the world in comparison to the US­MNT’s ranking at 32nd, the United States looked completely out of sorts. Playing an unconventional lineup with only two mid­fielders and starting two players who see little to no time on their respec­tive professional teams, the USMNT showcased all the symptoms of a team lacking any kind...

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