The Oberlin Review

College fourth-year and News Editor Katie Lucey.

News: A Year In “Review”

May 25, 2020

Editor’s note: This article appears as part of a series in which the Review’s graduating editors reflect on how their sections have evolved, the biggest stories of the year, and their time at the paper as a whole. The rest of this series can be found here.  From the impacts of COVID-19 on both the College and town, to student United Auto Workers activism, to the ongoing Gibson’s Bakery lawsuit, to the congressional race in our district, and more, Oberlin has seen an eventful year with plenty to...

College fourth-years Editor-in-Chief Nathan Carpenter and Managing Editor Ananya Gupta.

OTC: Review Editor-in-Chief Nathan Carpenter and Managing Editor Ananya Gupta

May 25, 2020

College fourth-years Ananya Gupta and Nathan Carpenter have served as the respective managing editor and editor-in-chief of The Oberlin Review for the past two years. As the first members of the Review staff to remain in these senior roles for two consecutive terms, they have taken special initiative in shaping the direction and community of the paper. From instituting a paperless production process and an annual staff retreat, to hosting a journalism symposium and creating a special environmental iss...

The NEXUS pipeline’s route through Oberlin.

Eight Years In, NEXUS Fight Continues

April 22, 2020

For the better part of a decade, Oberlin residents, City officials, and College students have been involved in a battle against NEXUS Gas Transmission, a 256-mile pipeline extension that was ultimately built through Oberlin city limits and continues to be opposed in court. The pipeline, which begins in the eastern part of Ohio and travels through the state before connecting to a transfer point in Michigan, is designed to carry up to 1.5 billion cubic feet of natural gas daily. The project represents a ...

Mary Annaïse Heglar.

Q&A: Mary Annaïse Heglar, OC ’06, Climate Writer

April 22, 2020

Mary Annaïse Heglar, OC ’06, is a writer who focuses primarily on personal essays about the intersections of climate and justice. She also serves as director of publications for the National Resources Defense Council, and is currently a writer-in-residence at Columbia University’s Earth Institute, where she is working on both short- and long-form pieces about climate change and its human impacts. Recently, Heglar has published on the COVID-19 pandemic, and the ways that grief over its spread ...

Sonia Shah.

Q&A: Sonia Shah, OC ’90, Investigative Journalist

April 22, 2020

Sonia Shah, OC ’90, is an investigative journalist and award-winning author. She has written several notable books, including The Next Great Migration: The Beauty and Terror of Life on the Move, set to release in June 2020. Her writing is focused on the intersections of science, environment, human rights, and international politics. Shah has lectured at top-tier universities and appeared on global platforms such as BBC, CNN, Al Jazeera, and NPR. She has also been featured in acclaimed publicatio...

In UCC Report, Northeast Ohio Identified As “Hot Spot” of Environmental Injustice

Nathan Carpenter, Editor-in-Chief

April 22, 2020

This past February, the United Church of Christ published a report on polluting facilities located in or near residential communities across the country. The report, titled “Breath to the People: Sacred Air and Toxic Pollution,” focused on 100 “super polluters” throughout the United States, and especially on the impact of those facilities on children under the age of five living in their vicinity. The report was primarily authored by Rev. Traci Blackmon, UCC associate general minister, and Rev. Brooks Berndt, UCC minister of environmental justice. In assembling the report’s narrative, the authors chose to focus on three “hot spots” of toxic air emissions: the Houston metropolitan area, Louisiana’s Cancer Alle...

Special Issue: Letter From the Editors

Nathan Carpenter and Ananya Gupta

April 22, 2020

Dear readers, As student journalists studying the environment, we have always strived to incorporate environmental initiatives into our work at The Oberlin Review, from shifting to a paperless editing process — saving approximately 10,000 pieces of paper annually — to reducing our print circulation. While we are certainly proud of these eco-friendly transitions in our workplace, we know that environmental and climate narratives are much larger than any person’s, or newspaper’s, individual choices. We still find ourselves intensely curious about the best ways to communicate about the climate challenges currently afflicting communities around the world, including Oberlin. In particular, we continue ...

Climate Change Hits Home

Climate Change Hits Home

April 22, 2020

https://issuu.com/theoberlinreview/docs/the_oberlin_review_special_issue/62

Campus Housing Announcements Spark Student Confusion, Frustration

Nathan Carpenter, Editor-in-Chief

April 15, 2020

Students remaining in College-owned housing were left confused and frustrated last week after receiving a pair of email communications — the first from the Office of Residential Education and the second from President Carmen Twillie Ambar — regarding potential changes to their living situations. The emails came after most students were required to vacate campus housing last month in response to the COVID-19 pandemic; students who stayed on campus went through a petition process in order to do so. On Tuesday, April 7, ResEd informed students in campus housing that they should start packing up their belongings in order to be “consolidated” into South, Langston, or Noah Halls beginning Friday, April 17. The ro...

Graph of projected hospital bed capacity needed to combat the COVID-19 outbreak in Ohio. Data is displayed for April 20, the projected statewide peak date. Graph courtesy of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington.

Ohio Generally Prepared for COVID-19 Outbreak, Data Models Suggest

March 31, 2020

As the COVID-19 outbreak continues to spread across the country, statistical models produced by public health professionals show that, in comparison to other states, Ohio is well-prepared to weather the pandemic. While statewide testing rates continue to lag behind national averages, Ohio’s capacity of available hospital beds is projected to be sufficient to handle the peak of the outbreak. As of Monday afternoon, 27,275 COVID-19 tests had been conducted across the state, with 1,933 positiv...

Faculty and staff distributed packing boxes to students in the Root Room in Carnegie Building beginning Friday morning. Students in College housing are required to vacate campus by Monday at noon. Box distribution will continue 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. on both Saturday and Sunday.

COVID-19 Outbreak Continues, College Moves to Remote Campus

March 13, 2020

In an email sent to the campus community Thursday afternoon, President Carmen Twillie Ambar announced that today will be the last day of classes prior to spring break and that students should plan to leave campus by noon on Monday, March 16. The decision is meant to help contain the spread of the novel coronavirus — known as COVID-19 — following the discovery of five confirmed cases in nearby Cuyahoga, Stark, and Trumbull Counties. Students should not expect to return to campus for the remainder...

Students, faculty, alumni, and United Automobile Workers members gathered to protest the College’s Feb. 18 announcement that it is “formally considering” outsourcing union labor.

Pressure Mounts Against Outsourcing Proposal; Senator Sherrod Brown Voices Support of UAW

March 6, 2020

Campus controversy continues to swirl around President Carmen Twillie Ambar’s Feb. 18 announcement that the College is “formally considering” outsourcing dining and custodial services, a proposal that could impact jobs currently held by 108 members of the United Automobile Workers union. While students and alumni have made their dissatisfaction with the proposal known, regional politicians and media have also begun to take notice — most notably Senator Sherrod Brown (D–OH), who circulated ...

Established 1874.